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Basically I am trying to build a hash structure of cstrings that I can re-assign the member stringnode_ref *nodes to a larger dimension array (malloc a new one, re-hash the existing values, and delete the old one) when the hash begins to fill up.

stringtable.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "stringtable.h"

struct stringnode{
    hashcode_t key;
    cstring value;
};

struct stringtable{
    size_t dim;
    size_t numEntries;
    stringnode_ref *nodes;
};

stringtable_ref new_stringtable(){
    size_t index = 0;
    stringtable_ref sTable = malloc(sizeof(struct stringtable));
    sTable->dim = 31;
    sTable->numEntries;
    sTable->nodes = malloc(31 * sizeof(struct stringnode));
    for( index = 0; index < 31; index++ ){
        sTable->nodes[index]->key = 0;
        sTable->nodes[index]->value = NULL;
    }
    return sTable;
}

stringtable.h:

#ifndef __STRINGTABLE_H__
#define __STRINGTABLE_H__

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

typedef char *cstring;

typedef uint32_t hashcode_t;

typedef stringtable *stringtable_ref;

typedef stringnode *stringnode_ref;

stringtable_ref new_stringtable();

#endif // __STRINGTABLE_H__

oc.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "stringtable.h"

int main( int argc, char **argv ){
    stringtable_ref table = new_stringtable();
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

compiling with:

gcc -g -O0 -Wall -Wextra -std=gnu99 -c stringtable.c
gcc -g -O0 -Wall -Wextra -std=gnu99 -c oc.c
gcc -g -O0 -Wall -Wextra -std=gnu99 -o oc stringtable.o oc.o

this all compiles fine with no errors but upon declaring stringtable_ref table = new_stringtable(); in the main(), the program segfaults at sTable->nodes[index]->key = 0;. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
You need to allocate memory and have it referenced by sTable->nodes, just as you do for sTable itself. –  alk Oct 16 '12 at 6:47
    
Im getting compilation error. error: unknown type name ‘stringtable’. i.e stringtable and stringnode is unknown during typedef. –  Jeyaram Oct 16 '12 at 6:48
    
The types' names are struct stringtable and struct stringnode. –  alk Oct 16 '12 at 6:49
2  
I cannot compile this code. What compiler and what options are you using? What is hashcode_t? –  January Oct 16 '12 at 6:49
    
@January Neither could I - but I figured out this error. You have to typedef hashcode_t (perhaps unsigned long?) and fix the borken typedefs in the first lines by adding the struct keyword. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 6:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
sTable->nodes = malloc(31 * sizeof(struct stringnode));
for( index = 0; index < 31; index++ ){
    sTable->nodes[index]->key = 0;

here's the problem: the segfault occurs because you don't allocate memory for sTable-nodes[index], so it may be garbage (when I examined your code on GDB under OS X, it was actually NULL).

Solution: add the following line as the first line of the body of the for loop:

sTable->nodes[index] = malloc(sizeof(*(sTable->nodes[index])));
share|improve this answer
    
Sidenote: as perhaps @bdonlan pointed out, there may be (and I suspect there are) other errors as well in your code, but this was the first one I could quickly spot and this fixed it for now. However, you still have to go through your entire code using GDB and your eyes also, after having understood pointers and constrained yourself to use the sizeof() operator correctly. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 6:58
    
However, sTable->nodes = malloc(31 * sizeof(struct stringnode)); is still incorrect, because sTable->nodes is a pointer to stringnode_ref, and not a pointer to struct stringnode. –  January Oct 16 '12 at 7:10
    
@January I think you missed my previous comment. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 7:21
    
No, I haven't missed that, and I agree with you, I'm just pointing out to a specific problem. sizeof( struct stringnode ) may be ugly and not recommended and thus treated as incorrect, but in itself it is not an error. However, it indicates that the intent of the programmer was different and that the problem lies with the defining nodes as stringnode_ref * rather than struct stringnode * or stringnode_ref. –  January Oct 16 '12 at 7:31
    
now that you pointed it out, it makes sense that I not only needed to declare sTable->nodes = malloc sizeof( 31 * sizeof( *sTable->nodes ); but also that only creates an array of stringnode_ref's. meaning for each stringnode_ref in the array, I am still required to malloc( sizeof( *sTable->nodes[index] )); Thanks you very much. –  wakerider47 Oct 16 '12 at 7:32

You define the nodes element of stringtable as a pointer to stringnode_ref, that is, as a pointer to pointer to struct stringnode. Since you do sTable->nodes = malloc(31 * sizeof(struct stringnode));, you calculate the size of sTable->nodes as if it was pointer to struct stringnode (which it isn't).

Possibly, you want to define stringtable like this:

struct stringtable{
  size_t dim;
  size_t numEntries;
  stringnode_ref nodes;
};

You can then initialize the nodes using

sTable->nodes[index].key = 0;
sTable->nodes[index].value = NULL;

Here is the whole code that compiles correctly and does not show memory errors with valgrind. Compilation with gcc -Wall --pedantic -o ttt -g ttt.c; checking for memory errors with valgrind --tool=memcheck ./ttt. Please note how sizeof() is used and implement it in your own code.

#include <stdlib.h>

typedef char *cstring;

struct stringnode{
    int key;
    cstring value;
};

typedef struct stringnode *stringnode_ref;

struct stringtable{
    size_t dim;
    size_t numEntries;
    stringnode_ref nodes;
};

typedef struct stringtable *stringtable_ref;

stringtable_ref new_stringtable(){
    size_t index = 0;
    stringtable_ref sTable = malloc(sizeof( *sTable ) ) ;
    sTable->dim = 31;
    sTable->nodes = malloc(31 * sizeof( *sTable->nodes ) ) ;
    for( index = 0; index < 31; index++ ){
        sTable->nodes[index].key = 0;
        sTable->nodes[index].value = NULL;
    }
    return sTable;
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  stringtable_ref table = new_stringtable();
  exit( EXIT_SUCCESS ) ;
}

P.S. The attempt to compile the code as you have described in your edited post results in the following:

:~/tmp$ gcc -g -O0 -Wall -Wextra -std=gnu99 -c stringtable.c
In file included from stringtable.c:2:
stringtable.h:11: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘*’ token
stringtable.h:13: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘*’ token
stringtable.h:15: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘new_stringtable’
stringtable.c:12: error: expected specifier-qualifier-list before ‘stringnode_ref’
stringtable.c:15: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘new_stringtable’
share|improve this answer
    
I chose the other answer because it more addressed the specific issue of why I was segfaulting. But thank you for showing me how sizeof() is intended to be used. –  wakerider47 Oct 16 '12 at 7:34

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