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I need to measure execution duration for each method in my winform .NET app. The output is into file.

Rather than I need to put code start time and end time to each .NET methods, I'm wondering whether there is a library to can do this by changing through config file to turn it on/off.

Thanks.

Koronx

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2 Answers 2

Try designing your application in such way that this cross-cutting concern can easily be added. For instance, put the business logic / behavior for a single use case in one class and decorate it with a generic interface:

public interface IUseCaseHandler<TUseCase>
{
    void Handle(TUseCase useCase);
}

The definition of the use case is a simple DTO (data transfer object):

public class MoveCustomerUseCase
{
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }

    public Address Address { get; set; }
}

The implementation can look like this:

public class MoveCustomerUseCaseHandler
    : IUseCaseHandler<MoveCustomerUseCase>
{
    public void Handle(MoveCustomerUseCase useCase)
    {
        // todo: business logic
    }
}

What did you gain here? Well, when all use case handlers implement the IUseCaseHandler<T> interface, you can write a single decorator for all handlers:

public class DurationMeasuringUseCaseHandlerDecorator<TUseCase>
    : IUseCaseHandler<TUseCase>
{
    private readonly IUseCaseHandler<TUseCase> decoratedInstance;
    private readonly ILogger logger;

    public DurationMeasuringUseCaseHandlerDecorator(
        IUseCaseHandler<TUseCase> decoratedInstance, 
        ILogger logger)
    {
        this.decoratedInstance = decoratedInstance;
        this.logger = logger;
    }

    public void Handle(TUseCase useCase)
    {
        var stopwatch = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();

        try
        {
            // call the real use case handler
            this.decoratedInstance.Handle(useCase);
        }
        finally
        {
            this.logger.Log(typeof(TUseCase).Name + 
                " executed in " + 
                stopwatch.ElapsedMiliseconds + " ms.");
        } 
    }
}

That seems a lot of code for a little bit of logging isn't it? No actually, it isn't. This is the only time you will have to write that code, and you don't have to alter any use case handlers to add measuring. You can just wrap all handlers like this:

// Composing the object graph
IUseCaseHandler<MoveCustomerUseCase> handler = 
    newMoveCustomerUseCaseHandler(
        new MoveCustomerUseCaseHandler(),
        new Logger());

// Using the object (somewhere else in the code)
handler.Handle(new MoveCustomerUseCase { CustomerId = id, Address = adr });

But now we'd still have to wire the object graph together every time we want to use this? This is where IoC containers come into the picture. For instance, using Simple Injector, it takes one line of code to register all use case handlers in the system:

container.RegisterManyForOpenGeneric(typeof(IUseCaseHandler<>),
    typeof(IUseCaseHandler<>).Assembly);

The RegisterManyForOpenGeneric method iterates through all public types in the assembly and registers all concrete types that implement the IUseCaseHandler<T> interface, by its closed generic representation (such as IUseCaseHandler<MoveCustomerUseCase>).

Wrapping all handlers with a decorator is just another one-liner:

container.RegisterDecorator(typeof(IUseCaseHandler<>),
    typeof(DurationMeasuringUseCaseHandlerDecorator<>));

With this configuration, we can request the container for an IUseCaseHandler<MoveCustomerUseCase> and it will return as the MoveCustomerUseCaseHandler wrapped with a DurationMeasuringUseCaseHandlerDecorator<MoveCustomerUseCase>:

var handler =
    container.GetInstance<IUseCaseHandler<MoveCustomerUseCase>>();

handler.Handle(new MoveCustomerUseCase 
{
    CustomerId = id, Address = adr
});
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You can use an AOP library for C# like postsharp.

Modified example from the postsharp documentation:

/// <summary>
/// Aspect that, when applied on a method, emits a trace message before and
/// after the method execution.
/// </summary>
[Serializable]
public class TraceAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{
    private string methodName;
    private DateTime startTime;

    /// <summary>
    /// Method executed at build time. Initializes the aspect instance. After the execution
    /// of <see cref="CompileTimeInitialize"/>, the aspect is serialized as a managed 
    /// resource inside the transformed assembly, and deserialized at runtime.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="method">Method to which the current aspect instance 
    /// has been applied.</param>
    /// <param name="aspectInfo">Unused.</param>
    public override void CompileTimeInitialize(MethodBase method, AspectInfo aspectInfo)
    {
        this.methodName = method.DeclaringType.FullName + "." + method.Name;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Method invoked before the execution of the method to which the current
    /// aspect is applied.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">Unused.</param>
    public override void OnEntry(MethodExecutionArgs args)
    {
        startTime = DateTime.Now;
        Trace.TraceInformation("{0}: Enter", this.methodName);
        Trace.Indent();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Method invoked after successfull execution of the method to which the current
    /// aspect is applied.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">Unused.</param>
    public override void OnSuccess(MethodExecutionArgs args)
    {
        Trace.Unindent();
        var duration = DateTime.Now - startTime;
        Trace.TraceInformation("{0}: Success, Duration: {1}ms", this.methodName, duration.TotalMilliseconds);
    }
}

To apply this to every method in your project, you have only to edit the assemblyinfo.cs and add:

 [assembly: SomeNamespace.TraceAttribute()]

The positive side of this is it's totally noninvasive and requires no change on your existing code.

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Don't use code weaving, use good design ;-) –  Steven Oct 16 '12 at 8:02
    
If you have a monstrous legacy application, you don't have any saying in the design - AOP can be very helpful. –  Vedran Oct 16 '12 at 10:49

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