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This problem is so simple and common but I still haven't been able to find a good solution for it. So I thought maybe some experts here in Stackoverflow can guide me about the best practices.

Let's say I have a several Javascript modules and put each of them in a separate file:

a.js
b.js
c.js
d.js

When releasing the software, I join them together and minify them:

//pseudo command:
cat a.js b.js c.js d.js | minify > all.js

Then I include reference to all.js in my html files like this:

<script src="all.js"></script>

So far so good. The problem is that when developing the software, I want to see the files as unminified and uncombined. One solution is to eliminate the minification from the process and do it like:

//pseudo command:
cat a.js b.js c.js d.js > all.js

and include it with the <script> tag. This works but I rather want to have the files included separately. So I have to do this in my html files:

<script src="a.js"></script>
<script src="b.js"></script>
<script src="c.js"></script>
<script src="d.js"></script>

This one works as I intended but then when releasing the code I have to go through all my html files and replace those 4 <script> tags with <script src="all.js"></script> and that is too much work for my project because there are many html files and we have debug/release cycles regularly.

One solution can be to have the script tag for all the files:

<script src="a.js"></script>
<script src="b.js"></script>
<script src="c.js"></script>
<script src="d.js"></script>
<script src="all.js"></script>

But this results to 4 erroneous requests at runtime. (because only all.js is available at release time).

How would you solve this problem?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why don't you use a javascript loader like headjs and serve your files dynamically?

Then when you go into production, you just need to modify the headJs call and include only the minified js file.

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Since I'm using an ASP.NET, I would solve the problem this way:

Default.aspx:

<%
if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["IsDebug"] == "true")
{
%>
<script src="Scripts/Application/Core/Constants.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
...
<script src="Scripts/Application/Core/Application.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<%
} else {
%>
<script src="Scripts/compressed.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<%
}
%>

Web.config:

<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="IsDebug" value="true"/>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

And I'm using Google Closure Compiler to combine all my JS to one file.


So, if your customer got an error, you can ask him to change IsDebug to true and check the console output (if you're using it) to get an origin of error.

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What we do is replace the <script src="xxx.js"> with a server-side function like <% Require("xxx.js"); %>.

This function is configured to either render a regular script reference for this file, or, when in minified mode, to figure out which aggregation group the file belongs to (you only have one group, called 'all', but this approach supports multiple aggregation groups) and add a script reference for that aggregated file if it wasn't yet required by some other Require() call.

This allows us to switch between aggregated (+minified) and non-aggregated mode at will during development. The released version is configured to use aggregated mode by default whereas the development version uses original mode.

Pseudo code:

string RequireScript(string filename) 
{
    if (!IsAggregated)
    {
        return "<script src='$(filename)'>";
    }
    else 
    {
        var group = FindAggregationGroupFor(filename); 
        if (group in _requiredGroups) return "";

        _requiredGroups.Add(group);
        return "<script src='/aggregated/$(group).js'>";
    }
}
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You could also write just one header file and then include it dinamically on every page of your web site, as a basic templating system.

Thus, you'd just have to modify one file to edit all pages.

Here's an example: http://www.davidjrush.com/blog/2009/08/php-header-and-footer-templates/

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