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I have a tab separated file like this:

Supercontig_1.1 400  1500  1       4
Supercontig_1.1 400  1500  2       4
Supercontig_1.1 20000  138566  1       1
Supercontig_1.1 20000  138566  2       1
Supercontig_1.2 300  1000  1       2
Supercontig_1.2 300  1000  2       2
Supercontig_1.2 1300  15000  1       2
Supercontig_1.2 1300  15000  2       2
Supercontig_1.3 0  10000  1       5
Supercontig_1.3 0  10000  2       5

And I want to extract all lines based on the pattern "Supercontig_1.X" into a separate file. I.e. all lines with Supercontig_1.1 in one file, all lines with Supercontig_1.2 in another... I tried looking into the "sed" command, but I am not sure how to use it when the search pattern is not the same for all lines.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way using awk:

awk '{ print $0 >$1 }' infile

That yields:

==> Supercontig_1.1 <==
Supercontig_1.1 400  1500  1       4
Supercontig_1.1 400  1500  2       4
Supercontig_1.1 20000  138566  1       1
Supercontig_1.1 20000  138566  2       1

==> Supercontig_1.2 <==
Supercontig_1.2 300  1000  1       2
Supercontig_1.2 300  1000  2       2
Supercontig_1.2 1300  15000  1       2
Supercontig_1.2 1300  15000  2       2

==> Supercontig_1.3 <==
Supercontig_1.3 0  10000  1       5
Supercontig_1.3 0  10000  2       5

I don't see your fields separated with comma, only spaces. Change the field separator (FS) if is that case, like: BEGIN { FS=","; } at the beginning of the script.

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You're right. I have a tab separated file. Fixed the mistake. Can I write "\t" as a separator? How to make output into separate files? –  Jon Oct 16 '12 at 7:48
    
@Jon: AWk by default split fields with any whitespace character, including tabs. You only must change the value of FS when separator is a different character, like commas. –  Birei Oct 16 '12 at 7:54
    
I see. It works fine. Thanks! –  Jon Oct 16 '12 at 8:04
    
BTW, how can I get the output files to be tab separated? I tried to use several versions of FS="\t", but then I get every line printed to the stdout. –  Jon Oct 16 '12 at 8:32
    
@Jon: How are fields separated in your input file? Only spaces, tabs, mixed? –  Birei Oct 16 '12 at 8:37

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;$!N;s/^((\S*)\s.*)\n\2.*/\1/;ta;s/(\S*).*/\/^\1\/w\1/;P;D' file | 
sed -nf - file

This will only work if the file is sorted.

If the file is not sorted use:

sort -u -k1,1 file | sed -r 's#^(\S*).*#/^\1/w\1#' | sed -nf - file
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