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I am trying to implement a script to set different class name on a specific element…

Let's suppose the dom looks like this:

<body class='pre-existing-class-name'>

If I make

smartToogle('body', 'new-class');
// the dom should look like this
// <body class='pre-existing-class-name new-class'>
smartToogle('body', 'new-class-2');
// the dom should look like this
// <body class='pre-existing-class-name new-class-2'>

I did the following code but it does not work:

var smartToogle = function (element, newClassName) {
    var oldClassName;
    var $element = $(element);

    $element.addClass(newClassName);
    if (oldClassName !== newClassName) {
        $element.removeClass(oldClassName);
    }
    oldClassName = newClassName;
};

Requirements:
1) I am using query
2) I would like to pass just one class name, the new one.


Solution:
The following code works but I do not like it because it uses global variable.
Any hint to fix it?

function myToggle(newClassName) {
    if (window.oldClassName) {
         $('body').toggleClass(window.oldClassName);
    }
    window.oldClassName = newClassName;
    $('body').toggleClass(newClassName);
}
share|improve this question
1  
I'm guessing the op wants to leave the original class name on the element and only add/remove the dynamically added ones? –  boz Oct 16 '12 at 8:15
    
yes you got the point, thanks @boz –  Lorraine Bernard Oct 16 '12 at 8:18
    
Why didn`t use the .addClass() method? See here api.jquery.com/addClass –  bodi0 Oct 16 '12 at 8:19
    
my suggestion is storing original class in a data-class attribute on first toggle and then have it easily accessible for future "toggles" –  Michal Klouda Oct 16 '12 at 8:20
2  
he just needs toggleClass() api.jquery.com/toggleClass and @LorraineBernard why are you storing the original class anyways? –  Berker Yüceer Oct 18 '12 at 8:28

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+200

You can use data attribute for the element, that is accessible using

$(element).data(attrib_name)

Just a small change is required in your method

function myToggle(newClassName) {
    if (window.oldClassName) {
         $('body').toggleClass(window.oldClassName);
    }
    window.oldClassName = newClassName;
    $('body').toggleClass(newClassName);
}

can be replaced with

function myToggle(element, newClassName) {
    if ($(element).data('oldClassName')) {
         $(element).toggleClass($(element).data('oldClassName'));
    }
    $(element).data('oldClassName', newClassName)
    $(element).toggleClass(newClassName);
}

Hope this solves it for you.

share|improve this answer

Update:

There is one thing you need to understand. If you want two different behaviors you don't need 2 different classes for the change in behavior. One is enough, because you can change the behavior based on weither the class is on or off.

Let's say I want my element to have a red hover event in one way. And want it to have a blue hover event the other way with CSS. Then this is the way to go:

$('#toggle').click(function(){
    $('.normal').each(function(){
        $(this).toggleClass('active');
    });        
});

JSFiddle Demo

Here we use a button to toggle all the divs and change their CSS behavior, looks easy now right?

However if you need to toggle Javascript/jQuery events as well this won't do. In that case you will need to use 3 other methods to manage this; .on(), .off(), and .hasClass().

$('#toggle').click(function(){
    $('.normal').each(function(){
        if($(this).hasClass('active')){
            $(this).off('click');
        } else {
            $(this).on('click', function(){
                alert('You are clicking on an active div.');
            });
        }
        $(this).toggleClass('active');
    });        
});

JSFiddle Demo 2

As you can see we have added an if statement. If the element has the .active class we turn .off() the .click(). And if there isn't an active class we turn the .click() .on(). Under the if statement we always toggle the .active class. So this doesn't have to be placed inside the if statement.

I hope this clears everything up for you, good luck!


Old Answer:

It is better to use .toggleClass() here.

Use a first class on the element for the default properties and a second like .active for example for the interaction.

Also, using a .on('click', function(){}) bind will make you able to add interaction that will be bound instantly once the element is toggled.

share|improve this answer
    
live is deprecated (and was always a bad idea). Better to use delegate (or the hyper-overloaded on) and use a container closer to the elements you want to handle. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 16 '12 at 8:20
    
+1 thank for your response. Actually, I don't understand exactly what do you mean. Because the issue is about how to keep memory of the old class name. –  Lorraine Bernard Oct 16 '12 at 8:52
    
you want 2 behaviors, like a switch on and off right? It's better to toggle a class by itself than to change the class name completely. –  Sem Oct 16 '12 at 10:58
    
+1 for .toggleClass() its the best choise here. –  Berker Yüceer Oct 18 '12 at 8:59
    
sometimes there are more than two states to choose from (on/off) but something like (stateA/stateB/stateC...). posted a jQuery plugin for this use case.. –  lrsjng Oct 19 '12 at 23:18

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/NCwmF/2/

I little jQuery plugin for that. Removes the current smart class (if any) and adds the new smart class. If called without parameter className the current smart class gets only removed.

$.fn.smartToggle = function (className) {

    var dataId = 'smartToggle';

    return this.each(function () {

        var $el = $(this);

        $el
            .removeClass($el.data(dataId) || '')
            .addClass(className)
            .data(dataId, className);
    });
};

​use it like every other jQuery method:

$('body').smartToggle('myClass');
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is the cleanest solution so far. –  gion_13 Oct 23 '12 at 15:50

NEW, SIMPLER ANSWER Works similar to before, with 2 additions: 1.) works if there is no class initially and 2.) works if other functions change the elements class in between calls. I also changed the function name so it doesn't interfere with jQuerys native toggleClass.

$.fn.fancyToggleClass = function(new_class) {
return this.each(function() {

    // get the last class this function added (if exists) or false (if not)
    var $this = $(this),
        toggled_class = $this.data('toggled-class') || false;       

    // if we dont have an original class, then set it based on current class
    if (toggled_class) {
        $this.removeClass(toggled_class);
    }

    // add new class and store as data, 
    // which we check for next time function is called
    $this.addClass(new_class).data('toggled-class', new_class);

    // alert the class, just as a check to make sure everything worked! 
    // remove this for production, or switch to console.log
    alert('element class: ' + $this.attr('class'));

});
}

updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/facultymatt/xSvFC/3/

OLD ANSWER I would suggest storing the original class in the elements data attribute. Then, your function can check if this data is set, and if so clear the elements class adding the original class from the elements data and also the new class you passed in the function.

If data is not set, the function will store the current class as data the first time it runs.

Check out this fiddle for a working example with comments: http://jsfiddle.net/facultymatt/xSvFC/

here is the code. It's a jquery function so it can be called on any element (and is chainable too!)

$.fn.toggleClass = function(new_class) {
    return this.each(function() {

        // cache selector for this
        $this = $(this);

        // get original class (if exists) or false (if not)
        var original_class = $this.data('original-class') || false;       

        // if we dont have an original class, then set it based on current class
        if (!original_class) {

            original_class = $this.attr('class');
            $this.data('original-class', original_class);

        // we do have an original class, so we know user is now trying to add class 
        // here we clear the class, add the original class, and add the new class           
        } else {

            // assign the original class, and new class, 
            // and a space to keep the classes from becoming one 
            $this.attr('class', original_class + ' ' + new_class);

        }

        // alert the class, just as a check to make sure everything worked! 
        // remove this for production, or switch to console.log
        alert('element class: ' + $this.attr('class'));

    });
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
new_class is not added when no original_class was found in data (on first call). What if other classes are changed between .toggleClass(...) calls? –  lrsjng Oct 23 '12 at 22:08
    
Good points, I updated the demo to handle these 2 scenerios jsfiddle.net/facultymatt/xSvFC/2 –  facultymatt Oct 24 '12 at 1:16

To avoid a global variable you can use data attribute as @ankur writes. Here is a working solution for your problem:

function myToggle(element, newClassName) { 
    if (!$(element).data('baseclassname')) { 
        $(element).data('baseclassname', $(element).attr('class')); 
    } 
    $(element)
        .attr('class', $(element).data('baseclassname'))
        .addClass(newClassName); 
}
share|improve this answer

Does this do your job?

var smartToogle = function (element, preExistingClassName, newClassName) {
    $(element)[0].className = preExistingClassName + ' ' + newClassName;
};
share|improve this answer

Just use hasClass. But you'll have to tell the function what both classes are:

function smartToggle(element, class1, class2) {
    var $element = $(element);

    if ($element.hasClass(class1)) {
        $element.removeClass(class1);
        $element.addClass(class2);
    }
    else {
        $element.removeClass(class2);
        $element.addClass(class1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for you suggestion. Actually I would like to pass to the function just the new class. It should remember the previous one. –  Lorraine Bernard Oct 16 '12 at 8:20
    
@LorraineBernard: Then modify the above to remember it, perhaps using data to store the old one. It's quite straight-forward to do that. Seems fragile, though. Also, remember that elements don't have just one class, it's a space-delimited list. So you'd have to know how to identify which of the classes on the element you should remove. That's why you need to pass both class names. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 16 '12 at 8:28
$(function(){
    var smartToggle = function (element, newClassName) {
        var elementClasses = element.attr('class');

        element.addClass(newClassName);

        // check if there is more than one class on the element
        if(elementClasses .indexOf(' ') >= 0){
            var oldClassNames = elementClasses.split(" ");

            if (oldClassNames[oldClassNames.length - 1] !== newClassName) {
                element.removeClass(oldClassNames[oldClassNames.length - 1]);
            }
        }

    };

    smartToggle($('.test'), 'newclass');
    smartToggle($('.test'), 'newclass2');
});

Demo - http://jsfiddle.net/Q9A8N/ (look at the console to see what it is doing on each pass)

That should do what you want but as @T.J. Crowder said it is rather fragile and assumes that the class you want to remove is the last one on the element.

share|improve this answer
    
you are pretty close to the solution...actually it does not work if the orginal class name is formed by two names. here is the example jsfiddle.net/Q9A8N/1 –  Lorraine Bernard Oct 18 '12 at 8:21
1  
@LorraineBernard - your original requirements only mentioned one class. Try jsfiddle.net/nkxz4 and see if that works for you. –  boz Oct 18 '12 at 10:35

As an answer to your question, I would go with ankur's answer

As a follow-up to Sem's answer, regarding the handling of jQuery events :

you can use the on function to handle any jquery event from a parent node, based on a live filter :

function myToggle(element, newClassName) {
    if ($(element).data('oldClassName')) {
         $(element).toggleClass($(element).data('oldClassName'));
    }
    $(element).data('oldClassName', newClassName);
    $(element).toggleClass(newClassName);
}

//event delegation : 'on' is called on the $('.divContainer') node, but we handle
//clicks on '.divItm' items, depending on their current class
$('.divContainer')
.on('click', '.divItm.plain', function(){ myToggle( this, 'red' ); })
.on('click', '.divItm.red', function(){ myToggle( this, 'blue' ); })
.on('click', '.divItm.blue', function(){ myToggle( this, 'plain' ); });

//initialize each item with the 'plain' class
myToggle( $('.divItm'), 'plain' );

Here is the jsFiddle.

You will note that the function called each time you click on an item depends on its "live" class, and that you don't need to manually enable/disable click handlers each time an item changes class.

You can learn more details from the documentation page.

share|improve this answer
var smartToogle = function (element, newClass) {
  var $element = $(element),
      currentClass = $element.data('toggle-class');

  if (currentClass != newClass) $element.data('toggle-class',newClass).removeClass(currentClass || '');

  $element.toggleClass(newClass);
};

or the other variant:

$.fn.smartToogle = function (newClass) {
      currentClass = this.data('toggle-class');

  if (currentClass != newClass) this.data('toggle-class',newClass).removeClass(currentClass || '');

  this.toggleClass(newClass);
};
share|improve this answer
    
this will remove all classes from element on first call since oldClass will be undefined and removeClass() will remove all classes if called without arguments.. –  lrsjng Oct 23 '12 at 18:58
    
my bad. edited. –  ChuckE Oct 23 '12 at 19:45

In this implementation you'll have to keep the a reference to this instance of fancytoggle.

var fancytoggle = function(el, oldClass){
    // create a function scope so we'll have a reference to oldClass 
    return function(newClass) {
        // toggle the old class and the new class
        $(el).toggleClass(oldClass+ ' ' + newClass);
        // update the new class to be the old class
        oldClass = newClass;
    };
};

for your example the code would look something like.

var bodytoggle = fancytoggle('body', 'pre-existing-class-name');
bodytoggle('new-class');
// 'new-class' replaces 'pre-existing-class-name'
bodytoggle('new-class-2');
// 'new-class-2' replaces 'new-class'

to see it in action refer to http://jsfiddle.net/aaf2L/6/

share|improve this answer

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