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int noOfAttempts = 3;
void StartServer();
bool IsServerRunning();

I need to re-attempt StartServer() 3 times based on result from IsServerRunnig(). Something like this:

StartServer();
if (!IsServerRunning())
{
    StartServer();
    if (!IsServerRunning())
    {
        StartServer();
        if (!IsServerRunning())
        {
            StartServer();
        }
    }
}

I don't want to use for loops or the ugly code like above. Is there a better way of doing this? A way in which, I won't have to change my code if noOfAttempts change in future?

EDIT: I'm expecting something from the "delegate" concept (If possible).

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closed as not a real question by Oded, Sulthan, Ryan Bigg, Reigel, Lucifer Oct 18 '12 at 1:33

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Why do you not want to use for loops? Seems like a good structure for this. –  Oded Oct 16 '12 at 8:31
    
@Oded: if noOfAttempts changes, then I will have to add another if condition to the code. –  Sandeep Oct 16 '12 at 8:32
    
I don't see why that would be, not if you use for loops correctly. –  Oded Oct 16 '12 at 8:33
5  
You should be using loops for this. It makes 0 sense to go for something more complicated and out of the ordinary. –  Oded Oct 16 '12 at 8:40
1  
What's wrong if I want to try out something new? It might help me in other complex scenarios. It's a well-known fact that loops are designed to use for this kinda things.. but just trying an attempt out of the box.. –  Sandeep Oct 16 '12 at 9:13
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11 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok.

3.TimesUntil(IsServerRunning, StartServer); 

Delegate magic here:

public static class Extensions 
{
    public static void TimesWhile(this int count, Func<bool> predicate, Action action)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < count && predicate(); i++) 
           action();
    }
    public static void TimesUntil(this int count, Func<bool> predicate, Action action)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < count && !predicate(); i++) 
            action();
    }
}

To esteemed downvoters: It's just for fun and I'd never write this code for real projects.

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i should be incremented each time, otherwise you'll just go until success (or forever in the case of failure) –  mlorbetske Oct 16 '12 at 9:43
    
It will work, and it uses delegates.... But it's a nonsense. Its unnecesarily complicated. Don't understand, why don't use loop for such simple task. –  Jakub Szułakiewicz Oct 16 '12 at 10:09
    
@mlorbetske, thanks, I forgot :) –  2kay Oct 16 '12 at 12:02
    
@Jakub Szułakiewicz, because Sandeep asked. And just for fun of course) –  2kay Oct 16 '12 at 12:03
    
But oh my... OP may not want to use this as it still contains a 'for' loop –  bart s Oct 16 '12 at 12:31
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You could use a while loop

int counter = 0;
while(counter < 3 && !IsServerRunning()) {
    StartServer();
    counter++;
}
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Here you go no loops...haha

private void Start(int numberOfAttempts)
    {
        if (numberOfAttempts == 0)
            return;

        StartServer();

        if (!IsServerRunning())
            Start(numberOfAttempts-1);
    }
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6  
Make it Start(--numberOfAttempts) or Start(numberOfAttempts-1) otherwise you'll face infinite recursion. –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 8:36
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As everybody already noted a while or for loop is really the most easiest part to solve this problem.

If you really want to setup something really advanced for this stuff take a look at the trampoline function question or take a look into the article from Bart. With this approach you would be able to avoid the loop (hence i don't think it would be worth in this case).

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Sure:

while (numRetries > 0 && !IsServerRunning) {
    StartServer();
    numRetries--;
}

If you feel adventurous, you could also use goto ;-)

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You could use a delegate if you really wanted.. (perhaps for a library of reusable things?)

public void CallFunctionNTimes(Action func, int nTimes, params bool[] conditions) {
    int callCounter = 0;

    while (callCounter < nTimes && conditions.All(x => x == true)) {
        func();
        callCounter++;
    }
}

Usage:

CallFunctionNTimes(StartServer, 3, !IsServerRunning /* Other stuff too if you want */);

.. not really much different than the other answers except its re-usable I guess :)

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How about the do.. while(false) loop? (joking, but seriously I've seen it in code before)

int numTries;

        do
        {
            if(numTries == 0)
                break;

            StartServer();
            numTries--;

            if (!IsServerRunning)
                continue;
        } while (false);
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I'd probably make it a builtin functionality of the StartServer method itself. Something like this (just a proof of concept):

public class ServerNotRunningException : Exception { /*No content here*/ }

public void StartServer(int attempts = 3)
{
    try
    {
        //attempt to start server
        if(!IsServerRunning()) // or check something available in your method
            throw new ServerNotRunningException();
    }
    catch(ServerNotRunningException ex)
    {
        // you should log ex.ToString() here!
        if(attempts>0) StartServer(attempts-1); //try again!
        else throw new ServerNotRunningException(); //mission failed, bubble up!
    }
}

usage:

StartServer();
//or, to make it try i.e. 5 times
StartServer(5);
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int numberOfAttempts = 3;

do
{
    StartServer();
    numberOfAttempts--;
} 
while(!IsServerRunning() && numberOfAttempts > 0)

UPDATE: Thus this operations are closely-related, you can create method

bool TryStartServer()
{
     StartServer();
     return IsServerRunning();
}

And second one which, will try to start server several times (and returns the result of operation)

bool TryStartServer(int numberOfAttemtps)
{
    for(int attempt = 0; attempt < numberOfAttempts; attempt++)
        if (TryStartServer)
            return true;

    return false; 
}
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It's better to have the retry logic totally separate from the main code:

void Attempt(Action action, Func<bool> ensure, int noOfAttempts)
{
   while (noOfAttempts-- > 0 && !ensure())
   {
       action();
   }
}

and then:

Attempt(action:StartServer, ensure:IsServerRunning, noOfAttempts:3)
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Just for fun

var calls = Enumerable.Repeat<List<string>>(new List<string>() { "IsServerRunning", "StartServer" }, noOfAttempts).ToList();
calls.ForEach(new Action<List<string>>(
    delegate(List<string> item)
    {
        // Use reflection here to create calls to the elements of item
    }
));
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