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The code sample is an simple example for what i'm working on. I have 2 classes in php.

class Wrap {

    public function wrapA($arg){
        return 'A'.$arg.'A';
    }

    public function wrapB($arg){
        return 'B'.$arg.'B';
    }

}

class Child extends Wrap {

    public $OUT;

    public function wrapA($arg){
        $this->OUT .= parent::wrapA($arg);
    }

    public function wrapB($arg){
        $this->OUT .= parent::wrapB($arg);
    }

    public function __destruct(){
        echo $this->OUT;
    }

}

$X = new Child();

$X->wrapA(
    $X->wrapB('CC')
);

The Output here is "BCCBAA". But what I try to achieve is "ABCCBA". The "Wrap" class must be in this form.

… and if I have the following method-calls:

$X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('1') );

$X->wrapA( $X->wrapB('aa') .$X->wrapA('bbb') .$X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('cccc') ) );

… i want to have the following output: BA1ABABaaBAbbbABAcccABA

Is there an other way?

I also want the Wrap-Class to work alone (without Child) … this is why the methods have return-value.

But in Child-Class I want to write the return-values in a variable.

THX in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Is it possible to check if "$arg" is a function/method or not? No. $arg will never be a function or method in this case. It's the return value of another method call. –  Dan Oct 16 '12 at 10:29

2 Answers 2

That's because $X->wrapB('CC') doesn't return anything and gets cast to an empty string by the time $X->wrapA() is called, thus A gets wrapped around nothing.

However, because you append BCCB to $X->OUT, by the time you call $X->wrapA(), it appends AA to that, leading to BCCBAA.

After looking at the question again, I feel that it should be solved in another way; this is something to consider:

class Wrap
{
    // The wrapping itself can be declared as a static method
    protected static function wrapWithChar($arg, $ch)
    {
        return $ch . $arg . $ch;
    }
}

class Child extends Wrap
{
    protected $OUT;

    // we allow the internal state to be set upon construction
    public function __construct($s = '')
    {
        $this->OUT = $s;
    }

    // no arguments required here, this gets applied on the internal state
    public function wrapA()
    {
        $this->OUT = self::wrapWithChar($this->OUT, 'A');
        // return instance to allow chaining
        return $this;
    }

    public function wrapB()
    {
        $this->OUT = self::wrapWithChar($this->OUT, 'B');
        return $this;
    }

    public function __toString()
    {
        return $this->OUT;
    }

    public function __destruct(){
        echo $this->OUT;
    }

}

// initialize with 'CC'    
$X = new Child('CC');

// wrap B around it; becomes 'BCCB'
$X->wrapB();
// wrap A around that; becomes 'ABCCBA'
$X->wrapA();

// example of chaining
$Y = new Child('ZZ');
// wrap B then A around it; becomes 'ABZZBA'
$Y->wrapB()->wrapA();

Old answer

To make Child appear as something that Wrap can perform on, you could make use of the __toString() magic method (using instanceof would be more explicit, but also a bit more work):

class Child extends Wrap
{
    public $OUT;

    public function wrapA($arg)
    {
        $this->OUT = parent::wrapA($arg);
        return $this;
    }

    public function wrapB($arg)
    {
        $this->OUT = parent::wrapB($arg);
        return $this;
    }

    public function __toString()
    {
        return $this->OUT;
    }

    public function __destruct(){
        echo $this->OUT;
    }
}

Each wrapX() method now returns the instance itself, and __toString() gets called whenever it needs to be wrapped.

The above will generate the correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
what effect should return $this->OUT . parent::wrapX($arg); have? Your answer doesn't help, because it does not solve the problem. It just shows in a detailed way what is happening… –  John Doe Smith Oct 16 '12 at 10:04
    
@JohnDoeSmith From my perspective, the exact solution to the (known) problem is not entirely clear because I don't know why the Child was created. I've updated my answer, but I doubt that would solve it either. –  Jack Oct 16 '12 at 10:16
    
@JohnDoeSmith Changed a few more things and it produces the correct output, but without knowing whether the behaviour is indeed correct :) –  Jack Oct 16 '12 at 10:26
    
@JohnDoeSmith let me work that out during dinner :) –  Jack Oct 16 '12 at 11:43
    
oh ya, that would be great. i've wasted the whole day now. if you really gonna do it: THX!!!.. and try also to get correct output for $X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('11') ); $X->wrapA( $X->wrapB('aaa') .$X->wrapA('bbb') .$X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('cccc') ) ); –  John Doe Smith Oct 16 '12 at 14:20

I added this to my favorites as an interesting puzzle to solve.

And then found that it wasn't that complicated after I woke up and looked at the problem again. I honestly don't think you should be using subclassing at this point since technically Child is not logically the a child of the Wrap class, it essentially seems to be a guy that wants to store the output of wrap's results.

so.. Here's my modifications that works with your original interface. Hope it's good for you ;).

It makes some very magical use of magic methods.

<?php
class Wrap {
    public function wrapA($arg){
        return 'A'.$arg.'A';
    }

    public function wrapB($arg){
        return 'B'.$arg.'B';
    }
}

class WrapReader{
    protected $wrapper;
    protected $currentResult;

    public function __construct(Wrap $wrapper)
    {
        $this->wrapper = $wrapper;
    }

    public function __call($method,$argument)
    {
        $argument = $argument[0];
        if(!method_exists($this->wrapper,$method))
            throw new MethodNotFoundException('Method: '.$method.'() does not exist in class: '.get_class($this->wrapper));
        $this->currentResult = $this->wrapper->$method($argument);
        return $this->currentResult;
    }

    public function __destruct(){
        echo $this;
    }

    public function __toString()
    {
        return $this->currentResult;
    }
}
class MethodNotFoundException extends Exception{}

The usage:

$reader = new WrapReader(new Wrap());

echo $reader->wrapB( $reader->wrapA('1') ); 
echo $reader->wrapA( $reader->wrapB('aa') .$reader->wrapA('bbb') .$reader->wrapB( $reader->wrapA('cccc') ) );
echo '<br>';

Outputs BA1ABABaaBAbbbABAccccABA

Which is what you posted in your original question.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry … 1. the "Child" class is a subclass … what i'm trying to find out here is only 1 functionality the class should have … 2. what you've written is nice but it does not work for the following calls in main-method: $X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('1') ); $X->wrapA( $X->wrapB('aa') .$X->wrapA('bbb') .$X->wrapB( $X->wrapA('cccc') ) ); ($X is like $reader in your code) –  John Doe Smith Oct 17 '12 at 10:59
    
@JohnDoeSmith But.. it outputs exactly what you posted in your original question :x. Actually as an edit, I noticed it doesn't have the beginning part. Oops! I cheated by doing two echos. –  Anther Oct 17 '12 at 11:21
    
ya.. that's cheating. But hey.. I don't want to use echo in the usage.. that is why I've posted this question here. If I use echo I don't need any modifications in the Child-class (or WrapReader).. because all methods are inherited.. –  John Doe Smith Oct 17 '12 at 11:38

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