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I want to write some try and catch that catch any type or exception, is this code is enough (that's the way to do in Java)?

try {
code....
}
catch (Exception ex){}

Or should it be

try {
code....
}
catch {}

?

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3  
Why would you want to do that? You should only catch exceptions that you can handle. –  Oded Oct 16 '12 at 9:47
    
Both will work... –  pengibot Oct 16 '12 at 9:47
    
Isn't this very easy to google? –  jgauffin Oct 16 '12 at 9:47
    
afaik both work perfectly fine in C# –  x4rf41 Oct 16 '12 at 9:48
    
You should write code in a way that you know what Exceptions may be thrown and handle each accordingly. It's bad practise to blanket catch all Exceptions. –  Darren Young Oct 16 '12 at 9:48
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Both approaches will catch all exceptions. There is no significant difference between your two code examples except that the first will generate a compiler warning because ex is declared but not used.

But note that some exceptions are special and will be rethrown automatically.

ThreadAbortException is a special exception that can be caught, but it will automatically be raised again at the end of the catch block.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.threadabortexception.aspx


As mentioned in the comments, it is usually a very bad idea to catch and ignore all exceptions. Usually you want to do one of the following instead:

  • Catch and ignore a specific exception that you know is not fatal.

    catch (SomeSpecificException)
    {
        // Ignore this exception.
    }
    
  • Catch and log all exceptions.

    catch (Exception e)
    {
        // Something unexpected went wrong.
        Log(e);
        // Maybe it is also necessary to terminate / restart the application.
    }
    
  • Catch all exceptions, do some cleanup, then rethrow the exception.

    catch
    {
        SomeCleanUp();
        throw;
    }
    

Note that in the last case the exception is rethrown using throw; and not throw ex;.

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Note that besides all other comments there is a small difference, which should be mentioned here for completeness!

With the empty catch clause you can catch non-CLSCompliant Exceptions when the assembly is marked with "RuntimeCompatibility(WrapNonExceptionThrows = false)" (which is true by default since CLR2). [1][2][3]

[1] http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb264489.aspx

[2] http://blogs.msdn.com/b/pedram/archive/2007/01/07/non-cls-exceptions.aspx

[3] Will CLR handle both CLS-Complaint and non-CLS complaint exceptions?

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Both are fine, but only the first one will allow you to inspect the Exception itself.

Both swallow the Exception, and you should only catch exceptions to do something meaningfull. Hiding a problem is not meaningful!

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All exceptions derive from Exception, so both of the above would work.

I would ask why you want to do this though. You should only catch exceptions that are recoverable.. everything else should make your application die a horrible fiery death. It's better that your application crashes than having it continue with possibly corrupt state.

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I don't want to handle the exception. I just want my program not to crash if its occur... –  Gorden Gram Oct 16 '12 at 9:51
    
So, something has gone wrong and you're not going to let the user know that it happened at all?... –  Simon Whitehead Oct 16 '12 at 9:52
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Both ways are correct If you need to do something with Exception object in catch block than you should use

try {
code....
}
catch (Exception ex){}

and than use ex in catch block.

Anyway, it is not always a good practice to cathc the Exception class, it is a beter practice to cathc a more specific exception - an exception which you can expect.

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