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I'm working on a function to perform multiple key=value substitutions with sed:

batch_sub () {
    local file="${@: -1}" # Last argument is file to be changed.
    [[ -w "${file}" ]] || { echo "Invalid file: ${file}" ; return 1 ; }
    for arg in "${@}" ; do
        [[ $arg =~ (.*)=(.*) ]] || continue
        # 'trim_str' will trim leading & trailing spaces.
        local key=$(trim_str "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}")
        local value=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        sed -i 's@'"\(${key}"' *=\).*@\1'"${value}"'@' "${file}"
    done
}

this function accepts arguments like:

batch_sub "a = x" "b = y" "c = z" "a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080" "/tmp/file"

and works fine. But what I want is to make it accept arguments like this:

batch_sub "a = x b = y c = z a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080" "/tmp/file"

Furthermore, it would be nice if sed is invoked only once inside this function:

sed -i -e 's/$key=/\1$value/'
       -e 's/$key1=/\1$value1/'
       '/tmp/file'

please advise.

share|improve this question
    
Note that 's/$key=/\1$value/' won't expand variables because of the single quotes. You can build an array in bash (an associative array in bash 4), or you can mash together your sed substitutions using semicolons. But you'll definitely need a concise input format. The one that your function already accepts works fine, but the one you "want" is unclear. What if there's an equals sign in a $value? –  ghoti Oct 16 '12 at 11:07
    
Yes, thanks for the heads up, I'm aware of that, those are just pseudo codes, was a little lazy to type & pair all the ". :) Thanks for the hints on "mash together your sed substitutions using semicolons". And I guess I'll leave 'if there's an equals sign in $value' for now. :) –  leafei Oct 17 '12 at 2:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

it would be nice if sed is invoked only once inside this function

You can call sed with multiple substitutions at a time. e.g.

sed -i 's/a/b/;s/p/q/'

So from all the arguments, generate a single string, which involves all the substitutions & then call sed once for all.

But what I want is to make it accept arguments like this
batch_sub "a = x b = y c = z a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080" "/tmp/file"

Why?
"a = x b = y c = z a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080" looks to me as ambiguious.
At least try to have some sort of delimiter for pairs, e.g.
"a = x; b = y; c = z; a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080"

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the hints on sed -i 's/a/b/;s/p/q/' & "a = x; b = y; c = z; a.b.d.e=udp://b:8080". –  leafei Oct 17 '12 at 1:56
    
You are welcome :-) –  anishsane Oct 18 '12 at 3:47

This might be crazy. But using the requirements you set perhaps something like this :)

#!/bin/bash

declare -r self=${0##*\/}

# Left and right trim
trim_str()
{
    local tmp="${1##[[:space:]]}"
    printf "%s" "${tmp%%[[:space:]]}"
}

# Replace \ with \\, / with \/, & with \&
sed_esc_repl()
{
    local tmp="${1//\\/\\\\}"
    tmp="${tmp//\//\\/}"
    tmp="${tmp//&/\&}"
    printf "%s" "$tmp"
}

# Additional escape on search pattern
# escape *.][|
sed_esc_key()
{
    local tmp=$(sed_esc_repl "$1")
    tmp="${tmp//./\.}"
    tmp="${tmp//\*/\*}"
    tmp="${tmp//|/\|}"
    tmp="${tmp//[/\[}"
    tmp="${tmp//]/\]}"
    printf "%s" "$tmp"
}

batch_sub()
{
    local file=""
    local -a argv
    local key=
    local val=
    local sedstr=""
    local old_ifs=$IFS

    if (( $# < 2 )); then
        printf "Usage: $self \"replacement pairs\" <file>\n"
        return 1
    elif (( $# > 2 )); then
        file="${@: -1}"
        argv=( "${@:1:$(($#-1))}" ) # Everything but last arg
    else
        file="$2"
        argv=( "$1" )
    fi

    [[ -w "${file}" ]] || { printf "Invalid file: %s\n" "${file}"; return 1; }

    # Set IFS  to match space and equal sign.
    IFS='='' '
    for arg in ${argv[@]}; do
        if [[ "$key" != "" ]]; then
            sedstr+="s/\("$(sed_esc_key "$key")"\) *=.*/\1="$(sed_esc_repl "$arg")"/g;"
            key=
        else
            key="$arg"
        fi
    done
    IFS="$old_ifs"

    printf "sed string:\"%s\"\n\n" "${sedstr%%;}"

    sed -i "${sedstr%%;}" "$file"
}

# Create example / test file:
printf "\
x[a-zA-Z].*? = mixture1
x[a-zA-Z].*p? = mixture2
x = foo
b*x = fafa
a\\\\1c = moo
a.b$.d.e=zim zala bim
" > tst

batch_sub "$@"

exit $?

Run by ie:

./keysw "x[a-zA-Z].*p? = x b*x = y a\1c = \z\n\1 a.b$.d.e=udp&://b:\8080" tst && cat tst

or

./keysw "x[a-zA-Z].*p? = x" \
        "b*x = y" \
        "a\1c = \z\n\1" \
        "a.b$.d.e=udp&://b:\8080" \
        tst && cat tst

Giving;

File:

x[a-zA-Z].*? = mixture1
x[a-zA-Z].*p? = mixture2
x = foo
b*x = fafa
a\1c = moo
a.b$.d.e=zim zala bim

Result:

x[a-zA-Z].*? = mixture1
x[a-zA-Z].*p?=x
x = foo
b*x=y
a\1c=\z\n\1
a.b$.d.e=udp&://b:\8080
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is a little scary. :) But still may I use some of your code? –  leafei Oct 17 '12 at 1:58
    
@leafei Yes. By all means :) The rather obfuscated file and command is only to test that regex does get properly escaped. –  Morpfh Oct 17 '12 at 2:31
    
Thank you. My task is quite basic, I think use @ as delimiter for sed is OK for now, need to be careful though. –  leafei Oct 17 '12 at 5:41

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