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i want to include value of i hex format in c.

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
   sprintf(s1"DTLK\x%x\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF",i);

but the above code outputs an error: \x used with no following hex digits

Pls any one suggest me a proper way....

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to escape the slash on front of the \x:

sprintf(s1"DTLK\\x%x\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF",i);
//              ^------- Here

Depending on what output you would like to achieve, you may need to escape the remaining slashes as well.

Currently, the snippet produces a sequence of six characters with the code 0xFF. If this is what you want, your code fragment is complete. If you would like to see a sequence of \xFF literals, i.e. a string that looks like \x5\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF when i == 5, you need to escape all slashes in the string:

sprintf(s1"DTLK\\x%x\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF",i);
//              ^    ^    ^    ^    ^    ^    ^

Finally, if you would like the value formatted as a two-digit hex code even when the value is less than sixteen, use %02x format code to tell sprintf that you want a leading zero.

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I rather think he wants the other way: the \xFF should expand to the value 0xFF while after the DTLK he wants a variable value... – glglgl Oct 16 '12 at 10:46
    
@glglgl It's hard to say for sure, but that's the only reason why I think the OP would ask specifically for a hex value. – dasblinkenlight Oct 16 '12 at 10:48
    
Some people mix up the characters themselves with their representation; that's why I think the opposite. YMMV. – glglgl Oct 16 '12 at 10:54

\x expects a hex value like \xC9.

If you want to include \x in your output, you need to escape \ with \\:

sprintf(s1"DTLK\\x%x\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF",i);
share|improve this answer
    
I rather think he wants the 5th byte to be 0..10... – glglgl Oct 16 '12 at 10:45

Supposing you don't want to literally have \x00..\x0A, but the corresponding byte, you need

sprintf(s1, "DTLK%c\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF",i);

while inserting \x%x would be at the wrong abstraction level...

If, OTOH, you really want to literally have the hex characters instead of the bytes with the named hey cahracters as their representation, the other answers might be more helpful.

share|improve this answer
sprintf(s1"DTLK\\x%x\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF",i);
//              ^------- Here

Depending on what output you would like to achieve, you may need to escape the remaining slashes as well.

Currently, the snippet produces a sequence of six characters with the code 0xFF. If this is what you want, your code fragment is complete. If you would like to see a sequence of \xFF literals, i.e. a string that looks like \x5\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF when i == 5, you need to escape all slashes in the string:

sprintf(s1"DTLK\\x%x\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF\\xFF",i);

//              ^    ^    ^    ^    ^    ^    ^

Finally, if you would like the value formatted as a two-digit hex code even when the value is less than 16, use %02x format code to tell sprintf that you want a leading zero.

share|improve this answer

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