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I want to iterate over a list of lists, and pull all the combinations from the lists.

I can do it in the following way:

list = [['1','2','3'],['a','b','c'],['x','y','z']]
for itemi in list[0]:
    print itemi
    for itemj in list[1]:
        print itemi+itemj
        for itemk in list[2]:
            print itemi+itemj+itemk

My problem is that I want to do it over a varying number of lists in the list o' lists. There will be at first just one list, and (for now) end with 64 lists.

The above example is for 3 lists, and in reality all the lists contain the same values (zero to 255). I used the above examples just so you can see what the output should look like.

I figured there must be a better way to this, without having to build the nested for loops for each size of list of lists.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you please describe in more detail what you mean by 'pull all the combinations from the lists'? –  user647772 Oct 16 '12 at 11:06
    
please add the output you want –  root Oct 16 '12 at 11:07
    
sure - I want to make a set of variables that represents every combination of each of the elements in the list of lists. In the above example, the outputs would be 1, 1a, 1ax, 1ay, 1az, 1b, 1bx ... 3b, 3bx, 3by, 3bz, 3c, 3cx, 3cy, 3cz. –  Jay Gattuso Oct 16 '12 at 11:09
1  
How are 1 and 3b combinations of three lists? –  user647772 Oct 16 '12 at 11:10
1  
have a look at PyChecker. It should give you a warning where you shadow a built-in. –  moooeeeep Oct 16 '12 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use itertools.product():

>>> l = [['1','2','3'],['a','b','c'],['x','y','z']]
>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.product(*l))
[('1', 'a', 'x'), ('1', 'a', 'y'), ('1', 'a', 'z'), ('1', 'b', 'x'), 
 ('1', 'b', 'y'), ('1', 'b', 'z'), ('1', 'c', 'x'), ('1', 'c', 'y'), 
 ('1', 'c', 'z'), ('2', 'a', 'x'), ('2', 'a', 'y'), ('2', 'a', 'z'), 
 ('2', 'b', 'x'), ('2', 'b', 'y'), ('2', 'b', 'z'), ('2', 'c', 'x'), 
 ('2', 'c', 'y'), ('2', 'c', 'z'), ('3', 'a', 'x'), ('3', 'a', 'y'), 
 ('3', 'a', 'z'), ('3', 'b', 'x'), ('3', 'b', 'y'), ('3', 'b', 'z'), 
 ('3', 'c', 'x'), ('3', 'c', 'y'), ('3', 'c', 'z')]

This is not quite what you want yet, but it's easy to get there:

>>> for i in range(len(l)):
...     print(list(itertools.product(*l[:i+1])))
...
[('1',), ('2',), ('3',)]
[('1', 'a'), ('1', 'b'), ('1', 'c'), ('2', 'a'), ('2', 'b'), ('2', 'c'), 
 ('3', 'a'), ('3', 'b'), ('3', 'c')]
[('1', 'a', 'x'), ('1', 'a', 'y'), ('1', 'a', 'z'), ('1', 'b', 'x'), 
 ('1', 'b', 'y'), ('1', 'b', 'z'), ('1', 'c', 'x'), ('1', 'c', 'y'), 
 ('1', 'c', 'z'), ('2', 'a', 'x'), ('2', 'a', 'y'), ('2', 'a', 'z'), 
 ('2', 'b', 'x'), ('2', 'b', 'y'), ('2', 'b', 'z'), ('2', 'c', 'x'), 
 ('2', 'c', 'y'), ('2', 'c', 'z'), ('3', 'a', 'x'), ('3', 'a', 'y'), 
 ('3', 'a', 'z'), ('3', 'b', 'x'), ('3', 'b', 'y'), ('3', 'b', 'z'), 
 ('3', 'c', 'x'), ('3', 'c', 'y'), ('3', 'c', 'z')]

Get everything in one list:

>>> result = []
>>> for i in range(len(l)):
...     result.extend(list(itertools.product(*l[:i+1])))
...
>>> result
[('1',), ('2',), ('3',), ('1', 'a'), ('1', 'b'), ('1', 'c'), ('2', 'a'), 
 ('2', 'b'), ('2', 'c'), ('3', 'a'), ('3', 'b'), ('3', 'c'), ('1', 'a', 'x'), 
 ('1', 'a', 'y'), ('1', 'a', 'z'), ('1', 'b', 'x'), ('1', 'b', 'y'), 
 ('1', 'b', 'z'), ('1', 'c', 'x'), ('1', 'c', 'y'), ('1', 'c', 'z'), 
 ('2', 'a', 'x'), ('2', 'a', 'y'), ('2', 'a', 'z'), ('2', 'b', 'x'), 
 ('2', 'b', 'y'), ('2', 'b', 'z'), ('2', 'c', 'x'), ('2', 'c', 'y'), 
 ('2', 'c', 'z'), ('3', 'a', 'x'), ('3', 'a', 'y'), ('3', 'a', 'z'), 
 ('3', 'b', 'x'), ('3', 'b', 'y'), ('3', 'b', 'z'), ('3', 'c', 'x'), 
 ('3', 'c', 'y'), ('3', 'c', 'z')]

Get it in the exact shape you want:

>>> sorted(result)
[('1',), ('1', 'a'), ('1', 'a', 'x'), ('1', 'a', 'y'), ('1', 'a', 'z'), 
 ('1', 'b'), ('1', 'b', 'x'), ('1', 'b', 'y'), ('1', 'b', 'z'), ('1', 'c'), 
 ('1', 'c', 'x'), ('1', 'c', 'y'), ('1', 'c', 'z'), ('2',), ('2', 'a'), 
 ('2', 'a', 'x'), ('2', 'a', 'y'), ('2', 'a', 'z'), ('2', 'b'), ('2', 'b', 'x'), 
 ('2', 'b', 'y'), ('2', 'b', 'z'), ('2', 'c'), ('2', 'c', 'x'), ('2', 'c', 'y'), 
 ('2', 'c', 'z'), ('3',), ('3', 'a'), ('3', 'a', 'x'), ('3', 'a', 'y'), 
 ('3', 'a', 'z'), ('3', 'b'), ('3', 'b', 'x'), ('3', 'b', 'y'), ('3', 'b', 'z'), 
 ('3', 'c'), ('3', 'c', 'x'), ('3', 'c', 'y'), ('3', 'c', 'z')]
share|improve this answer
1  
itertools to the rescue! (as always) –  Lattyware Oct 16 '12 at 11:07
    
can you constrain it use less than the full list of lists? (e.g. only use l[0] to 1[1]. I could iteratively clip the full list until and operate on the reduced version until I reach the limit, but I wondered if there is a way to do this within the itertools lib? EDIT: ha, beat me to it! thank you. Another nice tool to learn! :) I appreciate your time. –  Jay Gattuso Oct 16 '12 at 11:14

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