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Why I always need to assign a value to string variable, before actually using it to compare. For ex: Some input - obj

        string temp;
        if (obj== null)
        {
            temp = "OK";
        }
        string final = temp;

I get compile time error - something like - cant use unassigned variable 'temp'. But string variable has default value as 'null', which I want to use. So why this is not allowed?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

when default is null

The default is not null (or anything else) for a local variable. It's just unassigned.

You are probably thinking about a string field (a variable at the class level). That would be null :

private string temp;

private void M()
{
   if (obj== null)
   {
       temp = "OK";
   }
   string final = temp;  // default tnull
}

But inside a method, just initialize with the value you need:

string temp = null;
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Btw, a quick technical note. Because C# compiles to IL, and method-level IL is stack-based, variables technically do not exist unless they have been assigned. While the debugger might tell you that an unassigned variable equals 0 or something, in most cases, this is just a courtesy. It will only be created later. –  Greg Ros Oct 16 '12 at 12:18
    
@GregRoss - and when it is created I believe it is default(T) , null in this case. But neither is observable to a C# programmer. –  Henk Holterman Oct 16 '12 at 13:15
    
Not exactly. In IL, a variable cannot be declared without having an explicit value to which it can be assigned. In order to assign a variable to default(T) (or null), you would need to first retrieve this value using an explicit command, and only then allocate it. In practice, IL generated from C# never does this. While you might think you declared a variable, the IL usually doesn't declare it until it has a definite value to assign. –  Greg Ros Oct 16 '12 at 13:38

Then assing null as default for your local variable:

string temp = null;

It's just a compiler hint that you might have forgotten to assign a value. By explicitely assigning null you're telling the compiler that you've thought about it.

C# Language specification v. 4.0 section 1.6.6.2 "Method body and local variables" states the following:

A method body can declare variables that are specific to the invocation of the method. Such variables are called local variables. ... C# requires a local variable to be definitely assigned before its value can be obtained.

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