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I am using Ruby on Rails v3.2.2. In a module I am trying to "dynamically" open a class so to add to it a Ruby on Rails "scope method" that makes use of a local variable, this way:

module MyModule
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    # Note: The `CLASS_NAME` is not the class where `MyModule` is included. That
    # is, for instance, if the including class of `MyModule` is `Article` then
    # the `CLASS_NAME` is `User`.
    CLASS_NAME           = self.get_class_name.constantize # => User
    counter_cache_column = self.get_counter_cache          # => "counter_count"

    class CLASS_NAME
      def self.order_by_counter
        order("#{counter_cache_column} DESC")
      end
    end
  end
end

If I run the above code, I get the following error:

NameError
undefined local variable or method `counter_cache_column' for #<Class:0x0000010775c558>

It happens because the counter_cache_column in not called in the context of the module. How should I properly state the order_by_counter scope method?


Bonus: What do you advice about the above "so dynamic" implementation?

share|improve this question
    
I would like to improve the composition of your question, but I am having troubles myself to understand its meaning. What is a "scope method"? What do you mean by "dynamically" opening a class? Do you want to say that you know how to open a class "not dynamically"? And why are you surprised that a local variable declared outside the 'class CLASS_NAME' statement is not available inside? –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 16 '12 at 12:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

counter_cache_column is a local variable. Local variable are local to the scope they are defined in (that's why they are called local variables).

In this case, the scope is the block passed to included.

The class definition and the method definition create a new empty scope. Only blocks create nested scopes, so, you need to use a block to defined your method. Thankfully, there is a way to do so: by passing a block to define_method:

module MyModule
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    klass                = get_class_name.constantize # => User
    counter_cache_column = get_counter_cache          # => "counter_count"

    klass.define_singleton_method(:order_by_counter) {
      order("#{counter_cache_column} DESC")
    }
  end
end

I made some other style improvements:

  • self is the implicit receiver in Ruby, there is no need to specify it
  • CLASS_NAME is misleading: it doesn't contain the name of the class, it contains the class itself
  • also, I don't see why it would need to be a constant
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I also opened another question that could be related to this one: How to alias a class method within a module?. –  Backo Oct 16 '12 at 16:11

There are many quick and dirty ways of achieving what you want. For example, if you want the symbol 'counter_cache_column' to mean something outside its scope, you could declare it as a method rather than a local variable:

included do
  CLASS_NAME           = self.get_class_name.constantize # => User
  def counter_cache_column; get_counter_cache end        # => "counter_count"

  class CLASS_NAME
    def self.order_by_counter
      order("#{counter_cache_column} DESC")
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
please don't promote hackish/easy-to-break solutions –  simonmenke Oct 16 '12 at 12:11
1  
I am aware of that, but the question itself is quite shoddy. I actually didn't mean to answer it at all, I was only trying to uderstand and reword it, and ended up contributing my 5 cents :)) –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 16 '12 at 12:12
    
I think his question is perfectly clear. Maybe you should read up on the more subtle Ruby features –  simonmenke Oct 16 '12 at 12:15
    
Then tell me what is 'scope method'. The title itself is unclear. Also, you are on SO, so do not assume that the people here lack subtlety like your high school classmates. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 16 '12 at 12:16
    
a 'scope method' is what scope :hello, where(...) defines. scope :order_by_counter, order("#{self.get_counter_cache} DESC")is equivalent to the class_eval <<-RUBY ... RUBY portion of my answer –  simonmenke Oct 16 '12 at 12:19

Local variables are not passed on to reopened classes.

module MyModule
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    counter_cache_column = self.get_counter_cache # => "counter_count"

    class_eval <<-RUBY, __FILE__, __LINE__+1
      def self.order_by_counter               # def self.order_by_counter
        order("#{counter_cache_column} DESC") #   order("counter_count DESC")
      end                                     # end
    RUBY
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
The answer by @rossta is obviously cleaner –  simonmenke Oct 16 '12 at 12:10

The included block provided by ActiveSupport::Concern is evaluated within the scope of the including class. In other words, you've "reopened" the class within this block. If the including class inherits from ActiveRecord::Base, you can use any AR class macros, e.g. scope, has_many, attr_accessible, etc.:

module MyModule
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    scope :order_by_counter, order("#{self.get_counter_cache} DESC")
  end

end

This assumes that 'get_counter_cache` is already defined as a class method in the including classes (though this isn't clear from the code you've shown).

share|improve this answer
    
The CLASS_NAME is not the class where MyModule is included. That is, for instance, if the including class of MyModule is Article then the CLASS_NAME is User. Sorry if I was not clear. –  Backo Oct 16 '12 at 12:37
1  
Yes, that wasn't clear initially. I would strongly recommend against this approach; you're basically creating a side effect (manipulating a second object outside of the scope while modifying the first). This sort of thing is easy to forget and can be very difficult to track down in the future when bugs start to surface. –  rossta Oct 16 '12 at 13:10
    
You are right but I think that in my case "the game is worth the candle" ("it is worth the trouble/the effort"). Documentation can do the rescue in such cases? –  Backo Oct 16 '12 at 16:23
    
I can't make that judgement for you. But, when I find myself trying to write something that requires explanation, I usually find that there's another way, preferring to err on the side of POLS. –  rossta Oct 16 '12 at 16:57
    
I don't understand how the POLS fits in "creating a side effect". Can you providing an explanation that better relates to my case? –  Backo Oct 16 '12 at 18:42

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