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Sometimes I find myself in the situation where I want to execute several sequential commands like such:

try:
    foo(a, b)
except Exception, e:
    baz(e)
try:
    bar(c, d)
except Exception, e:
    baz(e)
...

This same pattern occurs when exceptions simply need to be ignored.

This feels redundant and the excessive syntax causes it to be surprisingly difficult to follow when reading code.

In C, I would have solved this type of problem easily with a macro, but unfortunately, this cannot be done in straight python.

Question: How can I best reduce the code footprint and increase code readability when coming across this pattern?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

You could use the with statement if you have python 2.5

from __future__ import with_statement
import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def handler():
    try:
        yield
    except Exception, e:
        baz(e)

Your example now becomes:

with handler():
    foo(a, b)
with handler():
    bar(c, d)
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If they're simple one-line commands, you can wrap them in lambdas:

for cmd in [
    (lambda: foo (a, b)),
    (lambda: bar (c, d)),
]:
    try:
        cmd ()
    except StandardError, e:
        baz (e)

You could wrap that whole thing up in a function, so it looked like this:

ignore_errors (baz, [
    (lambda: foo (a, b)),
    (lambda: bar (c, d)),
])
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The best approach I have found, is to define a function like such:

def handle_exception(function, reaction, *args, **kwargs):
    try:
        result = function(*args, **kwargs)
    except Exception, e:
        result = reaction(e)
    return result

But that just doesn't feel or look right in practice:

handle_exception(foo, baz, a, b)
handle_exception(bar, baz, c, d)
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3  
You can simplify that function by just returning instead of assigning to "result". –  John Millikin Sep 24 '08 at 19:06

In your specific case, you can do this:

try:
    foo(a, b)
    bar(c, d)
except Exception, e:
    baz(e)

Or, you can catch the exception one step above:

try:
    foo_bar() # This function can throw at several places
except Exception, e:
    baz(e)
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2  
If foo() raised an exception, bar() would not be executed. That is not the desired behavior. –  Sufian Sep 24 '08 at 19:10

You could try something like this. This is vaguely C macro-like.

class TryOrBaz( object ):
    def __init__( self, that ):
        self.that= that
    def __call__( self, *args ):
        try:
            return self.that( *args )
        except Exception, e:
            baz( e )

TryOrBaz( foo )( a, b )
TryOrBaz( bar )( c, d )
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4  
Your spacing is horrible. See "Whitespace in Expressions and Statements" python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 25 '08 at 3:58
4  
Not "horrible". Idiomatic and atypical. And a 30-year habit starting from Pascal and C. Not changing any time soon to remove spaces from close to ()'s. Need the spaces for aging infrastructure (eyes, mostly) –  S.Lott Sep 25 '08 at 9:59
    
Habits dictate what we find readable. Other old eyes find the spaces distracting due to other habits. –  Alfe Jan 16 '13 at 14:44

If this is always, always the behaviour you want when a particular function raises an exception, you could use a decorator:

def handle_exception(handler):
    def decorate(func):
        def call_function(*args, **kwargs):
            try:
                func(*args, **kwargs)
            except Exception, e:
                handler(e)
        return call_function
    return decorate

def baz(e):
    print(e)

@handle_exception(baz)
def foo(a, b):
    return a + b

@handle_exception(baz)
def bar(c, d):
    return c.index(d)

Usage:

>>> foo(1, '2')
unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'str'
>>> bar('steve', 'cheese')
substring not found
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