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Consider the following ko bindings on a select element:

<select data-bind="value: valueObservable, options: optionsObservableArray, 
    optionsCaption: '[None] - this is an optional field'">

... given a viewmodel like the following:

function MyViewModel()
{
    var self = this;
    self.valueObservable = ko.observable();
    self.optionsObservableArray = ko.observableArray();

    // ajax call to load options
    ko.computed(function() {
        $.ajax(...)
        .success(function(optionsResponse) {
            self.optionsObservableArray(optionsResponse)
        });
    });

    // ajax call to load data value
    ko.computed(function() {
        $.ajax(...)
        .success(function(valueResponse) {
            self.valueObservable(valueResponse)
        });
    });
}

What's weird about this is when the second (data) ajax call returns before the first (options) ajax call. Since the select element has an optionsCaption binding, here is what I believe is happening:

  1. The data ajax call completes, setting the valueObservable to some value (like 6, abc, or some other non-falsy value).
  2. Because there is only 1 option in the select element (due to the optionsCaption), and because the valueObservable is bound to it (via the value binding), this causes the valueObservable to be changed to undefined.
  3. Finally, the optionsObservableArray completes and adds new option elements to the select, but by this time it is too late: The valueObservable is now wrapping an undefined value rather than the real data value returned from the first ajax call.

Question: What is the best way to work around this? Here is what I can think of:

  1. Make the first ajax call run with async: false. This may slow page rendering.
  2. Create a separate observable for binding to the select value (such as value: selectedValueObservable). Then subscribe to the optionsObservableArray and use the subscription to do something like self.selectedValueObservable(self.valueObservable()). This seems like a bandaid fix.
  3. Render the select & options to the page before any javascript executes by sending the options data from the server (using MVC viewmodel). This makes it a little more difficult to deal with the options as an observableArray.

Update

There is another concern which I omitted from this question to simplify the example code. In actuality, this viewmodel is used to create an editable list of data items. So there is actually more than 1 dropdown list that gets rendered to the page. The data ajax call really returns an array, and its success function really sets an observableArray of complex items. Since the dropdown list options are reused in every inline form, it is placed on the $parent viewmodel and only loaded once. It is also difficult to pass the select options in a single ajax call because the data items are retrieved via WebAPI (which returns an IEnumerable, no room to send additional dropdown options).

share|improve this question
    
What is the reason to wrap ajax call into computed ? –  vittore Oct 16 '12 at 13:39
    
@vittore, wrapping the ajax call in a ko.computed causes it to be executed immediately. Basically it initializes the viewmodel by sending the ajax calls off when the viewmodel is constructed. –  danludwig Oct 16 '12 at 14:00
    
there are many other way to execute function immediately, and computed doesnt seem to be designed for that. –  vittore Oct 16 '12 at 14:11

2 Answers 2

I would suggest you to have one ajax call if it is possible. Make your controller to return complex object with array of objects and selected value:

// ajax call to load options and data value
ko.computed(function() {
    $.ajax(...)
    .success(function(response) {
        self.optionsObservableArray(response.options);
        self.valueObservable(response.value);
    });
});

If it is impossible to merge two ajax call you can put calling of the second ajax to success callback of the first ajax:

// ajax call to load options
ko.computed(function() {
    $.ajax(...)
    .success(function(optionsResponse) {
        self.optionsObservableArray(optionsResponse)

        // ajax call to load data value
        $.ajax(...)
        .success(function(valueResponse) {
             self.valueObservable(valueResponse)
        });
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Your first suggestion is not feasible in my case since all of the ajax calls hit WebAPI, not MVC (I have updated the question to reflect this). The second option would work, though I'm not sure I like the idea of serial chaining as a best practice. –  danludwig Oct 16 '12 at 12:43

Is there any reason not to make ajax call first and applyBinding on done ?

$.when(getOptions(), getData()).done(bind) 


function getOptions() { 
    return $.ajax(...).success(vm.optionsObservableArray)
}

function getData() {
    return $.ajax(...).success(vm.valueObservable)
}

function bind() {
    ko.applyBindings(vm, document.getElementById('elem')) 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting solution. It's a little more complex than this though, because the vm takes a dependency on the getData() function. Editing a single item in the array can change the sort order in which the items should appear, so after editing, I would want to rebind the whole array (and I use the ko.mapping plugin to do this) to enforce the new sort order. This is why I have the vm encapsulating the function to make the ajax call, rather than having it outside of the vm construction and binding code. –  danludwig Oct 16 '12 at 14:07
    
you can execute that within your viewmodel, noone prevent you from doing that. bind is just an example , as both success handlers which i put as example only. –  vittore Oct 16 '12 at 14:13
    
my point is to execute binding to DOM after you got all the data, as you cant render DOM properly prior to that moment anyway. –  vittore Oct 16 '12 at 14:13
    
I agree, there is nothing stopping me from using these functions within the viewmodel. However, what are the major differences between doing it this way, and having immediately executed viewmodel-encapsulated $.ajax functions that execute with async: false? In both cases, applyBindings does not happen until after all data is received, right? In reality, the editable form is hidden from the user initially, but read data is shown. The user can click to edit the item and display the form, so delaying the load of the select options is acceptable from a requirements perspective. –  danludwig Oct 16 '12 at 14:33
    
In your code applyBindings is executed before data is received. –  vittore Oct 16 '12 at 14:45

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