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On my WCF service I have a couple of custom fault types. An abstract type called BaseFault and two implementations of it called TypeOneFault and TypeTwoFault

I am throwing the exception on the service side like this

public string ThisMethodHasFault(string eType)
{
    if (eType.Contains("One"))
    {
        TypeOneFault one = new TypeOneFault("TypeOneFault thrown");
        throw new FaultException<TypeOneFault>(one, new FaultReason(new FaultReasonText("Fault reason here")));
    }
    else
    {
        TypeTwoFault two = new TypeTwoFault("TypeTwoFault thrown");
        throw new FaultException<TypeTwoFault>(two, new FaultReason(new FaultReasonText("Fault reason here")));
    }

    return "";
}

My Service interface is like this

[OperationContract]
[FaultContract(typeof(TypeOneFault ))]
[FaultContract(typeof(TypeTwoFault ))]
string ThisMethodHasFault(string eType);

On the client side I have a test winform application where I catch it like this

   MyServiceClient client = new MyServiceClient();

   try
    {
        client.ThisMethodHasFault(""); //get value from user

    }
    catch (FaultException<TypeOneFault>  ox)
    {
         TypeOneFault oneEx = ox.Detail;
         oneEx.{property} ...

    }   
    catch (FaultException<TypeTwoFault>  tx)
    {
         TypeTwoFault twoEx = tx.Detail;
         twoEx.{property} ...
    }    

Question:

I cant seem to be able to reduce the number of catch blocks by doing this instead

    catch (FaultException<BaseFault> fex)
    {
         BaseFault Ex = fex.Detail;
         twoEx.{property} ...
    }    

It would have been nice to have one such block that could capture any exception that I throw on the server and through abstraction I get the right class's details. By doing the above I get an error. An unhandled exception of type 'System.ServiceModel.FaultException1' occurred in mscorlib.dll`

Is there something I need to change to make this work or do I have to be content with multiple catch blocks only?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

FaultException<T> inherits from FaultException, so you can catch the base type instead:

catch(FaultException ex) {
    if(ex is FaultException<TypeOneFault>) {
        var detail = ((FaultException<TypeOneFault>) ex).Detail;
        // process it
    } else if(ex is FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) {
        var detail = ((FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) ex).Detail;
        // process it
    } else {
        // unexpected error
        throw;
    }
}

Unlike the two separate catch blocks, this can be refactored:

    catch(FaultException ex) {
        if(!ProcessFault(ex)) {
            throw;
        }

bool ProcessFault(FaultException ex) {
    if(ex is FaultException<TypeOneFault>) {
        var detail = ((FaultException<TypeOneFault>) ex).Detail;
        // process it
        return true;
    } else if(ex is FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) {
        var detail = ((FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) ex).Detail;
        // process it
        return true;
    } else {
        // unexpected error
        return false;
    }
}

If your two fault classes are not related, then that's as far as you can go. However, if they inherit from a common base, then you can refactor further:

bool ProcessFault(FaultException ex) {
    if(ex is FaultException<TypeOneFault>) {
        ProcessFault(((FaultException<TypeOneFault>) ex).Detail);
        return true;
    } else if(ex is FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) {
        ProcessFault(((FaultException<TypeTwoFault>) ex).Detail);
        return true;
    } else {
        // unexpected error
        return false;
    }
}

void ProcessFault(BaseFault detail) {
    // process it
}
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Thats the same as having multiple catch blocks. I have to evaluate each exception separately.. –  user20358 Oct 16 '12 at 13:00
    
It's just as many lines of code, but one catch block is a heck of a lot easier to deal with than two. You can refactor the contents into a separate method for a start. –  Christian Hayter Oct 16 '12 at 13:05
1  
Updated answer with what I think you want. –  Christian Hayter Oct 16 '12 at 13:13
    
Thanks Christian, but wouldn't I be breaking the Open Close principle here? If another exception type is added then I need to revisit this method and add another ELSE clause. If I could just BaseClass b = new DerivedClass(); ....where I get the derived class somehow via the FaultException's variable ex then all I need to do is throw a new exception type in the service. The client doesnt need to change. –  user20358 Oct 16 '12 at 13:28
1  
You are asking for behaviour that is simply not provided by the WCF API I'm afraid. The only solution is to code round it. I don't see how having to maintain one small method is breaking the OCP. –  Christian Hayter Oct 16 '12 at 13:33
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How about something like this, using FastMember for convenience, but you could get the same effect using dynamic and some try/catch blocks:

try
{
    client.ThisMethodHasFault("");
}
catch (FaultException e)
{
    var accessor = TypeAccessor.Create(e.GetType());
    var detail = accessor.GetMembers().Any(x => x.Name == "Detail")
                     ? accessor[e, "Detail"] as BaseFault
                     : null;

    if (detail != null)
    {
        // Do processing here
    }
    else
    {
        throw;
    }
}
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