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I have two classes:

  class Car<T>
{
    public string color { get; set; }
    public virtual T features { get; set; }
    public virtual void TestDrive();
}
class Toyota : Car<ToyotaFeatures>
{
    public override ToyotaFeatures features { get; set; }
    public override void TestDrive()
    {
        //Logic here...
    }
}

Now i have a full string class name: "MySol.MyProj.Toyota"
I want to instantiate a class by my string name and then run TestDrive().
The problem is that when I try to run Activator.CreateInstance(null, "MySol.MyProj.Toyota");
I cannot cast it to a base class and run testDrive because it is expecting ToyotaFeatures class to be passed to it. but I just want to run TestDrive() only having a string class name.

And I don't want to cast it to specific type. only to base type so it can decide which TestDrive() to run based on the provided string.

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you want to cast the instance to the base class? Don't you want to run the TestDrive method on your instance? E.g., myInstance.TestDrive() – Brenda Bell Oct 16 '12 at 12:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

For that purposes interfaces are extra good.

interface ITestDrivable
{
    void TestDrive();
}

Your abstract class implements the interface:

class Car<T> : ITestDrivable
{
    public string Color { get; set; }
    public virtual T Features { get; set; }
    public abstract void TestDrive() { }
}

And casting comes very easy:

ITestDrivable car = (ITestDrivable)Activator.CreateInstance(null, "MySol.MyProj.Toyota");
car.TestDrive();
share|improve this answer
    
That looks awesome. Can you also explain please how do I pass generic dataRow to a constructor so I can populate color and other properties? – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 12:50
    
Can I do this inside my derived class? The thing is, I have a generic method, called: convertToObject<T>(DataRow dr) which returns object of myType, but I'm not sure how to use it in my constructor. I was thinking about something like: this = ConvertToObject<Toyota>(dr) but this is not allowed. – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 12:52
    
Or maybe I ca do this inside TestDrive(DataRow dr) method somehow. – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 12:55
    
@user194076 First of all, you cannot do the this = something thing. Because this is readonly keyword. – AgentFire Oct 16 '12 at 13:23
    
@user194076 Second, I do not completely understand what you are trying to do. – AgentFire Oct 16 '12 at 13:24
Type type = Type.GetType("MySol.MyProj.Toyota");

var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
type.GetMethod("TestDrive").Invoke(obj, null);
share|improve this answer
    
Reflection is slow and should be used when there is no other way. – AgentFire Oct 16 '12 at 12:37
    
Is it possible to pass parameters to a constructor this way? do I have to cast to base class – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 13:10
1  
@user194076 you can pass parameters in an object array (Activator.CreateInstance(type,new object[]{param1,param2}) . – L.B Oct 16 '12 at 13:14
    
Thanks. I've ended up using interface and your implementation of activator with parameters. – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 20:10

You should implement the interface IConvertible in your classes and then use the method Convert.ChangeType(..). Code Sample could be:

   // hords the created object
   object createdByActivator = ....;
   Car objectAsCar = Convert.ChangeType(createdByActivator, Type.GetType("MySol.MyProj.Toyota"

)

share|improve this answer
    
that Car objectAsCar thing in your code it his issue. He cannot just write Car, its actually Car<>, therefore, a generic class. – AgentFire Oct 16 '12 at 12:48

Would that make any sense:

abstract class CarFeatures { }

class ToyotaFeatures : CarFeatures { }

abstract class Car
{
    public string color { get; set; }
    public virtual void TestDrive() { }
}

abstract class Car<T> : Car where T : CarFeatures
{
    public virtual T features { get; set; }

    public Car(T _features)
    {
        features = _features;
    }
}

class Toyota : Car<ToyotaFeatures>
{
    public override ToyotaFeatures features { get; set; }

    public Toyota(ToyotaFeatures _features) : base(_features) { }

    public override void TestDrive()
    {
        //Logic here...
    }
}

More than once, I derived my generic class from a non-generic one to put all my common methods and fields that were not generic-dependant, giving me an easy access to them.

ToyotaFeatures features = new ToyotaFeatures();
Car car = (Car)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(Toyota), new object[] { features });
car.TestDrive();

However, if someone has a better solution, I would be interrested too.

EDIT: As said above, interface are cool, but my rule of thumb is "Don't create an interface if you use it for only one class". But it works.

RE-EDIT: The problem was instanciating a generic object with a collection of params.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot cast to Toyota because I only have string name of a class. It can be Honda as well. – user194076 Oct 16 '12 at 12:53
    
Why would you cast to Toyota if you only want to call TestDrive? Is there a special method in Toyota that you want to access? EDIT: AH! I think I see where you're going with this. You are creating a new object and you're having an hard time populating it's fields on initialization. – LightStriker Oct 16 '12 at 12:59
    
There you go. Activator.CreateInstance allows you to pass the params required by a Constructor. If your base class define a constructor that requires the CarFeatures, you can set them on the creation of your object. From that point, your object should be correctly setup to call its methods. – LightStriker Oct 16 '12 at 13:10

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