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I have a properties file that holds username and password which I use in my java program however I am not being able to store more than one username and password like I do in database and just select where username and password match the many rows in the database. I imagine I need to have a two-dimensional array stored in the file holding usernames and corresponding passwords but I've failed to figure out how to do it and neither has google given me a way to hold a two-dimensional array in a file yet. Here are the key/value pairs for my username and password in the file

    `password=k
     username=k`

And here is the code that reads them and compares with what the user inserts

   `String usr = userfield.getText();
    String pwd = new String(pwdfield.getPassword());
    Properties config = new Properties();
    InputStream is;

    try {

        is = new FileInputStream("config.properties");
        config.load(is);

        if (usr.toString().equals(config.getProperty("user").toString()) && pwd.toString().equals(config.getProperty("pass").toString())) {
            new DocMenu();
            lgFrame.dispose();

        } else {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(lgFrame, "Wrong credentials try again", "Oops", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);

        }

        is.close();

    } catch (Exception ex) {
        System.out.println(ex);
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }`

Could someone please tell me how to change the properties file and the code so that I am able to have multiple usernames and passwords in the file to grant access to any user as long as their username and password exist.

share|improve this question
    
Why not store it in HashSet? and serialize/deserialize it? –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 12:41
    
Thanks @Prototype Stark. Can you give an example or illustration how to use HashSet –  ken Oct 16 '12 at 12:46
    
ok i will show you how to –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 12:46
    
You can have your credential properties like so: usernameA=p@ssW0rdA and usernameB=l0km30t and when the user enters their username then it looks for that property and returns the password which is compared with the password that they entered. Caution: This is a bad way to do credentials, because you should have some encryption on the password when you put it in the properties file and your program should also encrypt the users password entry and then compare the two. –  Knownasilya Oct 16 '12 at 12:47
    
I suggest you to check your design: having multiple (identical) usernames does not make much sense - you need to manage unique ID per user. However, if the fact that you cannot distinguish among users having the same username does not bother you, you can store their passwords in comma-separated list which will be translated by Properties, to ArrayList<String>. –  aviad Oct 16 '12 at 12:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you store the property name as a concatenation of some key with the username, and the password as the value like this;

#Some bad passwords
username.bob=password
username.scott=tiger
username.admin=admin

..then you can check like this;

String password = config.getProperty("username." + usr.toString());
if (password != null && password.equals(pwd.toString())) {
  new DocMenu();
  lgFrame.dispose();
} else {
  JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(lgFrame, "Wrong credentials try again", "Oops", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is now working. Thank you. –  ken Oct 16 '12 at 13:23
    
@ken great - but as has been said, this is a bad way to store credentials, I hope you're not using this to secure anything significant. –  Qwerky Oct 16 '12 at 15:11

In your posted code, you have 'username' in the properties, and you are trying to read the 'user' property. Same goes for the password.

But this will only allow you yo have one pair user/pwd. You should have a more elaborated structure in your properties file. For instance you could have

user1=pwd1
user2=pwd2
...

and then check with something like :

if (password != null && password.equals(config.getProperty(usr)){
 // ok ...
}
share|improve this answer

If you have to use properties, I think there's little option beyond doing

username.1
username.2
username.3

and iterating through until you have an index that you can't find the property for (in this case, username.4).

For more complex configurations, I would investigate frameworks such as Apache Commons Config, which can handle lists of elements.

share|improve this answer

As promised, here is the HashSet serialise/deserialise code:

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

class UserPasswordMap{
   private HashMap<String,String> userMap;
   private String m_filename;
   public UserPasswordMap()
   {
       userMap = null;
       m_filename = null;
       userMap = new HashMap<String,String>();
   }

   public UserPasswordMap(String filename, String credo)
   {
       try{
          m_filename = filename;
          File f = new File(m_filename);
          userMap = new HashMap<String,String>();
          if(f.exists() && (!(f.canRead() && f.canWrite()))){ 
              System.err.println("Oops, Insufficient permissions to read/write for filename: "+m_filename);
          }else{
              f.createNewFile();
          }
       }catch(Exception e){
           System.err.println(e.getMessage());
       }

       if(credo.equals("D")){
           try{
           ReadMap(filename);
           }catch(Exception e){ System.err.println(e.getMessage());}
       }
   }
   public void ReadMap(String filename) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException
   {
       FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(filename);
       ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
       userMap = (HashMap<String,String>)ois.readObject();
       fis.close();
   }

   public void WriteMap(String filename) throws IOException{
       FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(filename);
       ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
       oos.writeObject(userMap);
       oos.close();
   }

   public ArrayList<String> getUsers()
   {
       ArrayList<String> users = new ArrayList<String>();
       if(userMap == null){
           return null;/*or return users*/
       }else{
           for(String s:userMap.keySet()){
               users.add(s);
           }
       }
       return users;
   }

   public ArrayList<String> getPasswords()
   {
       ArrayList<String> passwords = new ArrayList<String>();
       if(userMap == null){
           return null;/*or return users*/
       }else{
           for(String s:userMap.values()){
               passwords.add(s);
           }
       }
       return passwords;
   }

   public String getPassword(String username)
   {
       return userMap.get(username);
   }

   public void addUser(String username, String password){
       userMap.put(username, password);
       try{
           WriteMap(m_filename);
       }catch(Exception e){
           System.err.println(e.getMessage());
       }
   }

   public void saveData(){
       if(m_filename == null){
           System.err.println("File-Name is not supplied");
       }else{
           try{
              WriteMap(m_filename);
           }catch(Exception e){
               System.err.println(e.getMessage());
           }
       }
   }
}

And the test code:

public class Main{
    private UserPasswordMap map;
    public static void main(String[] args){
       Main obj = new Main();
       obj.init();
       Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
       System.out.println("0. Init With Serialisation(CAN THROW ERROR)");
       while(true){
          System.out.println("1. Add New User");
          System.out.println("2. Query Permissions");
          System.out.println("3. Exit");
          int data = scan.nextInt();
          switch(data){
          case 0: obj.initWithSerialisation();
          break;
          case 1: obj.addNewUser();
          break;
          case 2: obj.queryPerms();
          break;
          case 3: System.exit(0);
          }
       }
    }

    public void init()
    {
         map = new UserPasswordMap("try1.ser","");
    }

    public void initWithSerialisation()
    {
        map = new UserPasswordMap("try1.ser","D");
    }
    private Scanner scan;
    public void addNewUser()
    {
        System.out.print("Enter User:");
        scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        String username = scan.nextLine();
        System.out.print("Enter Pass:");
        String password = scan.nextLine();
        map.addUser(username, password);
    }

    public void queryPerms()
    {
        System.out.print("Enter User:");
        if(scan == null){ scan = new Scanner(System.in);}
        String username = scan.nextLine();
        System.out.print("Enter Pass:");
        String pass = scan.nextLine();

        if(map.getUsers().contains(username) && map.getPassword(username).equals(pass)){
            System.out.println("authenticated!");
        }else{
            System.out.println("Oops Wrong credentials!");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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