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I have following structure:

Day with multiple events of typ1 and typ2, where typ1 and typ2 have foreign keys to their respective days. Typ2 also has duration.

Now I want to count all typ1 events, all typ2 events and sum of the typ2 duration.

Example Data:

Day:

ID = 1 | Date = yesterday | ...

Typ1:

ID = 1 | FK_DAY = 1 | ...

ID = 2 | FK_DAY = 1 | ...

Typ2:

ID = 1 | FK_DAY = 1 | duration = 10

ID = 2 | FK_DAY = 1 | duration = 20

I now want the result:

Day.ID = 1 | countTyp1 = 2 | countTyp2 = 2 | sumDurationTyp2 = 30

My problem is the sum, I need something like "sum for distinct typ2.ID"... Does anyone know a way to solve that?

I'm using something like the following, but that of course does not work the way I want:

SELECT day.id,
   count( DISTINCT typ1.id ),
   count( DISTINCT typ2.id ),
   sum( duration ) AS duration
FROM days
   LEFT JOIN typ
          ON day.id = typ1.id
   LEFT JOIN typ2
          ON day.id = typ2.id
GROUP BY day.id;
share|improve this question
    
What RDBMS and what version? – Tobsey Oct 16 '12 at 12:53
up vote 7 down vote accepted

My general approach to this is to pre-aggregate each table, before joining.

Partly because you're not actually summing distinct values (if each of the two rows had 10, the answer is still 20).

But mostly because it's actually simpler that way. The sub-queries do the aggregation, then the joins are all 1:1.

SELECT
  days.id,
  typ_agg.rows,
  type2_agg.rows,
  type2_agg.duration
FROM
  days
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT fk_day, COUNT(*) as rows FROM typ GROUP BY fk_day)  AS typ_agg
    ON days.id = typ_agg.fk_day
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT fk_day, COUNT(*) as rows, SUM(duration) as duration FROM typ2 GROUP BY fk_day)  AS typ2_agg
    ON days.id = typ2_agg.fk_day
share|improve this answer
    
. . I hope this is the accepted answer, because it is the right approach. – Gordon Linoff Oct 16 '12 at 13:04
    
Thanks a lot, in my actual query that is more complex, that really makes it much more readable – prom85 Oct 16 '12 at 13:10
SELECT day.id,
   count( DISTINCT typ1.id ),
   count( DISTINCT typ2.id ),
   (select sum( t2.duration )
    from typ2 t2
    where t2.id = day.id
   ) AS duration
FROM days
   LEFT JOIN typ
          ON day.id = typ1.id
   LEFT JOIN typ2
          ON day.id = typ2.id
GROUP BY day.id;
share|improve this answer
    
This introduces additional subqueries, and I believe the OP was looking for a single query solution. Does your answer mean to imply it can't be written as a single query? – Yuck Oct 16 '12 at 12:56
    
@Yuck - Where does it say single query or no sub-queries. Why do you consider sub-queries not part of a single query? (If they're a sub- of something, they're a part of it, and it is a single query...) Not to mention that certain RDBMS are exceptional at expending sub-queries out. – MatBailie Oct 16 '12 at 12:58
    
FWIW that isn't my downvote. And at least in SQL Server, this type of query has (often) severe performance penalties. Not that it's wrong. I was just asking the question - is there a way to do this without sub-selecting the tables involved? – Yuck Oct 16 '12 at 13:00
    
I'm using SQLite and this answer is what I was looking for... if there is a faster way, I'm still intereseted in it though... – prom85 Oct 16 '12 at 13:03

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