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I would like to extend the host object Error to a custom UploadError class. The following example fails when I compile:

class UploadError extends Error {
    constructor(message: string, private code: number) {
        super(message);
    }

    getCode(): number {
        return this.code;
    }
}

When I run the TypeScript compiler tsc I get the following error:

UploadError.ts(1,0): A export class may only extend other classes, Error is an interface.

It seems Error is defined as an interface. If anyone knows what the name of the implementation is it would make me very happy :-)

Update: I want to use Typescripts inheritance not prototypical inheritance like I currently employ to hack around this:

function UploadError (message: string, code: number) {
    this.message = message;
    this.code = code;
}

UploadError.prototype = new Error();

UploadError.prototype.constructor = UploadError;

UploadError.prototype.getCode = (): number => {
    return this.code;
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have found the following approach works:

declare class ErrorClass implements Error {
    public name: string;
    public message: string;
    constructor(message?: string);
}
var ErrorClass = Error;

class MyError extends ErrorClass {
    public name = "MyError";
    constructor (public message?: string) {
        super(message);
    }
}

The generated script looks like:

var ErrorClass = Error;
var MyError = (function (_super) {
    __extends(MyError, _super);
    function MyError(message) {
        _super.call(this, message);
        this.message = message;
        this.name = "MyError";
    }
    return MyError;
})(ErrorClass);
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3  
For me, this generates the compile error: error TS2000: Duplicate identifier 'ErrorClass'. –  sboisse Jul 18 '13 at 4:26

Most of the answers here don't meet my requirements. The originally accepted answer doesn't compile anymore since 0.9.5 with a duplicate identifier exception. And non of them really have a stack trace (a JavaScript issue, not TypeScript).

For me a more elegant solution is:

module YourModule {
    export declare class Error {
        public name: string;
        public message: string;
        public stack: string;
        constructor(message?: string);
    }

    export class Exception extends Error {

        constructor(public message: string) {
            super(message);
            this.name = 'Exception';
            this.message = message;
            this.stack = (<any>new Error()).stack;
        }
        toString() {
            return this.name + ': ' + this.message;
        }
    }
}

What you can do with it:

  • new Exception("msg") instanceof Error == true
  • class SpecificException extends Exception
  • catch (e) { console.log(e.stack); }

The only limitation I found was that you have to declare it in a module, and cannot make them global. For me this isn't an issue since I think a module helps in structuring, and they are there in any application I make.

One improvement you could make is strip your custom code from the stack trace, personally I think stacktraces are only for the eyes of developers, and they know where to look, so it's no big deal for me.

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1  
yes that is it. –  wcandillon Aug 10 at 2:35

You can implement the error interface in TypeScript, but this won't give you access to super as you aren't using inheritance:

class UploadError implements Error {
    public name = "CustomError";

    constructor (public message: string, private code: number){

    }
}

throw new UploadError ("Something went wrong!", 123);

There are a couple of options for changing this in TypeScript.

  1. Start a discussion on Codeplex about changing Error to a class declaration, rather than an interface.

  2. Create your own definition of error and sneak it into the TypeScript definition file in place of the interface - although you would have to maintain your own track for this if you can't convince the community for a change.

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You can use the prototype to add functions and attributes:

interface Error {
   code: number;
   getCode(): number;
}   

Error.prototype.code = 1;

Error.prototype.getCode = function () {
    return this.code;
}  
var myError = new Error();
console.log("Code: " + myError.getCode());

When run with node.js, this produces the following output:

Code: 1

Error is defined in lib.d.ts as follows:

interface Error {
    name: string;
    message: string;
}

declare var Error: {
    new (message?: string): Error;
    (message?: string): Error;
    prototype: Error;
}

Other than that, I see only the obvious solution to define your own interface that extends Error:

interface MyErrorInterface extends Error {       
    code: number;       
    getCode(): number;    
}       
class MyError implements MyErrorInterface {      
    code : number;      
    name : string;      
    message : string;
    constructor(code: number, name? : string, message? : string) {
        this.code = code;
        this.name = name;
        this.message = message;
    }   
    getCode(): number {
        return this.code;
    }   
}   

var myError = new MyError(1);
console.log("Code: " + myError.getCode());
share|improve this answer
    
That is what I currently have in place. But I didn't switch to TypeScript so I can still do inheritance myself. –  Marijn Huizendveld Oct 16 '12 at 13:15
    
I've added my current hack around this in the main post (since SO doesn't allow Markdown in comment #fail). –  Marijn Huizendveld Oct 16 '12 at 13:21
    
@MarijnHuizendveld Since Error is an interface I'm afraid there is no other way to do this that I'm aware of. –  Valentin Oct 16 '12 at 13:27
    
see my previous update. That code is working, however, I'd like a solution that is more TypeScript niceness and less JavaScript-ish... –  Marijn Huizendveld Oct 16 '12 at 13:28
    
I have updated my answer. Does that help? –  Valentin Oct 16 '12 at 13:36

I know the answer has been accepted, and the solution is definitely impressive, but I really don't want that amount of code in my projects just for an exception.

Until TypeScript gets proper exceptions at the language-level somehow, with Error being so cumbersome to extend, I'm now using the following very simple solution:

class MyError {
    constructor(error: Error) {
        error.name = this['constructor'].name;
        error['type'] = this; // for type-checking in exception-handlers

        return error;
    }
}

throw new MyError(new Error('aw snap!'));

Now, my error-types are really classes - you can extend them, and you will see the correct class-name on the console when an unhandled Error is thrown; but my Error objects are not instances of those classes: the constructor does not return an instance of MyError, it just applies it's own name to the Error instance you pass to it.

This also provides a simple work-around for the issue of Error producing it's stack-trace at the point where you construct it, rather than at the point where you throw it - since the constructor signature forces you to construct a "real" Error instance.

If you need to check the type of exception in your exception-handler, grab the ['type'] property and compare it using instanceof:

try {
    // something throws new MyError(new Error('aw snap!'))
} catch (error) {
    console.log(error['type'] instanceof MyError); // => true
}

It's not ideal, but it's simple and it works.

Be aware that, if you extend MyError, you will need to implement the constructor every time and add return super(...), since the default constructor generated by TypeScript does not expect constructors that use the return-statement. It does allow them though.

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Ron Buckton's solution worked for me when using TypeScript 0.8.3, but it does not compile in TypeScript 0.9.5. TypeScript generate compilation error: Duplicate identifier 'ErrorClass'. I have changed the code to make it work again:

declare class ErrorClass {
    public name: string;
    public message: string;
    constructor(message?: string);
}

// Move following line to a JavaScript
// (not TypeScript) file. 
// var ErrorClass = Error;

class MyError extends ErrorClass {
    public name = "MyError";
    constructor (public message?: string) {
        super(message);
    }
}
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