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For the windows azure queues the scalability target per storage is supposed to be around 500 messages / second (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/hh697709.aspx). I have the following simple program that just writes a few messages to a queue. The program takes 10 seconds to complete (4 messages / second). I am running the program from inside a virtual machine (on west-europe) and my storage account also is located in west-europe. I don't have setup geo replication for my storage. My connection string is setup to use the http protocol.

       // http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazurestorage/archive/2010/06/25/nagle-s-algorithm-is-not-friendly-towards-small-requests.aspx
        ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false;

        CloudStorageAccount storageAccount=CloudStorageAccount.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DataConnectionString"]);

        var cloudQueueClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudQueueClient();

        var queue = cloudQueueClient.GetQueueReference(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        queue.CreateIfNotExist();
        var w = new Stopwatch();
        w.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++ )
        {
            Console.WriteLine("nr {0}",i);
            queue.AddMessage(new CloudQueueMessage("hello "+i));    
        }

        w.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("elapsed: {0}", w.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        queue.Delete();

Any idea how I can get better performance?

EDIT:

Based on Sandrino Di Mattia's answer I re-analyzed the code I've originally posted and found out that it was not complete enough to reproduce the error. In fact I had created a queue just before the call to ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false; The code to reproduce my problem looks more like this:

        CloudStorageAccount storageAccount=CloudStorageAccount.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DataConnectionString"]);

        var cloudQueueClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudQueueClient();

        var queue = cloudQueueClient.GetQueueReference(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        //ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false; // If you change the nagle algorithm here, the performance will be okay.
        queue.CreateIfNotExist();
        ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false; // TOO LATE, the queue is already created without 'nagle'
        var w = new Stopwatch();
        w.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++ )
        {
            Console.WriteLine("nr {0}",i);
            queue.AddMessage(new CloudQueueMessage("hello "+i));    
        }

        w.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("elapsed: {0}", w.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        queue.Delete();

The suggested solution from Sandrino to configure the ServicePointManager using the app.config file has the advantage that the ServicePointManager is initialized when the application starts up, so you don't have to worry about time dependencies.

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How is it if you remove the Console.WriteLine() from the loop? –  cirrus Oct 16 '12 at 13:21
    
then it's a few milliseconds faster, but still around 4 messages / sec. –  shaft Oct 16 '12 at 13:24
    
I think that 500/s is overall scalability performance of a single Queue, not necessarily serial read/write. A single thread isn't how to scale, so perhaps it's your round-trip delay. Can you switch to async or try batch operations? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/hh528527.aspx –  cirrus Oct 16 '12 at 13:38
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I answered a similar question a few days ago: How to achive more 10 inserts per second with azure storage tables.

For adding 1000 items in table storage it took over 3 minutes, and with the changes I described in my answer it dropped to 4 seconds (250 requests/sec). In the end, table storage and storage queues aren't all that different. The backend is the same, data is simply stored in a different way. And both table storage and queues are exposed through a REST API, so if you improve the way you handle your requests, you'll get a better performance.

The most important changes:

  • expect100Continue: false
  • useNagleAlgorithm: false (you're already doing this)
  • Parallel requests combined with connectionManagement/maxconnection
share|improve this answer
    
I tried out your suggestion and it worked immediately (using the system.net config section from your other post). Thank you! However, I was curious why my code didn't work well without the changes in the app.config, after all I programmatically set the nagle algorithm to false as well. I turned out that when you programmatically configure the ServicePointManager, you have to do it before you instantiate any queue. –  shaft Oct 16 '12 at 14:27
    
I'm having perf trouble too, you had 4 m/s what did the improvements give you? –  pkr2000 Jul 31 '13 at 20:03
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Also, ServicePointManager.DefaultConnectionLimit should be increased before making a service point. Actually Sandrino's answer says the same thing but using config.

Turn off proxy detection even in the cloud. Auto detect in proxy config element. Slows initialisation.

Choose distributed partition keys.

Collocate your account near to compute, and customers.

Design to add more accounts as needed.

Microsoft set the SLA at 2,000 tps on queues and tables as of 07 2012.

I didn't read Sandrino's linked answer, sorry, just was on this question as I was watching Build 2012 session on exactly this.

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