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public void LoadRealmlist()
{
    try
    {
        File.Delete(Properties.Settings.Default.WoWFolderLocation + 
            "Data/realmlist.wtf");

        StreamWriter TheWriter = 
            new StreamWriter(Properties.Settings.Default.WoWFolderLocation + 
            "Data/realmlist.wtf");

        TheWriter.WriteLine("this is my test string");
        TheWriter.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {       
    }            
}

Will my method properly delete a file, then create one with "realmlist.wtf" as the name and then write a line to it?

I'm kind of confused because I can't see the line where it actually creates the file again. Or does the act of creating a StreamWriter automatically create a file?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Stream Writer will create the file if it doesn't exist. It will create it in the constructor, so when the StreamWriter is instantiated.

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Just to be clear, the second line inside my Try() statement will create the file? –  Sergio Tapia Aug 18 '09 at 3:08
1  
Yep: "StreamWriter TheWriter = new StreamWriter(Properties.Settings.Default.WoWFolderLocation + "Data/realmlist.wtf"); " –  Russell Aug 18 '09 at 3:09
    
All I needed to know, thank you very much! –  Sergio Tapia Aug 18 '09 at 3:13

You know, if you pass a FileStream instance to the StreamWriter constructor, it can be set to simply overwrite the file. Just pass it along with the constructor.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filestream.filestream.aspx

Example:

try
{
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Create))
    {
        //FileMode.Create will make sure that if the file allready exists,
        //it is deleted and a new one create. If not, it is created normally.
        using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fs))
        {
           //whatever you wanna do.
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(e.Message);
}

Also, with this you won't need to use the .Close method. The using() function does that for you.

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Try System.IO.File.CreateText.

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