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I have the following scenario. A decimal value needs to be displayed as a currency but include the appropriate currency symbol and sign, thus:

  1. -45.23 is displayed as -£45.23
  2. 45.23 is displayed as +£45.23

The currency sign must come from System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol. I have this, but I can't find a way to swap the sign and currency symbol:

string s1 = string.Format(@"{1}{0:+#,##0.00;-#,##0.00}", 45.09M, 
    System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol);
Console.WriteLine(s2);
string s2 = string.Format(@"{1}{0:+#,##0.00;-#,##0.00}", -45.09M, 
    System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol);
Console.WriteLine(s2);

Outputs:

£+45.09
£-45.09

I want:

+£45.09
-£45.09

UPDATE

Someone posted another answer regarding the NumberFormatInfo.CurrencyPositivePattern Property, which looked promising, especially since the but it appears that Microsoft overlooked the possibility that the NumberFormatInfo.CurrencyNegativePattern Property contains various options for the presentation of the negative sign. However, the NumberFormatInfo.CurrencyPositivePattern does not include an option to include the positive sign! Damn. Thanks to whoever it was that mentioned it, but deleted their comments. I learnt someone nevertheless.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your string.Format is explicitly putting the +/- at the front.

If you split the operation into two steps, it becomes easier. First inject your currentcy symbol, then format your number.

string fmt = string.Format(@"{{0:+{0}#,##0.00;-{0}#,##0.00}}",  
    System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol);
string s1 = string.Format(fmt, 45.09M);
Console.WriteLine(s1); 
string s2 = string.Format(fmt, -45.09M);
Console.WriteLine(s2); 
share|improve this answer
    
I want the string.Format explicitly display the +/-. Is that what you meant? I actually liked your idea. I converted this into an extension method. Two string.Format calls, but at least it is more readable. – Junto Oct 16 '12 at 14:39
    
You could also cache the format string, if you're not likely to change currency. – Dan Puzey Oct 16 '12 at 14:49
    
It felt a bit weird giving the answer to myself. All yours. – Junto Oct 19 '12 at 11:01

As I posted this, I realised the answer is to do this in three steps instead of two:

string s1 = string.Format(@"{0:+;-}{1}{0:#,##0.00;#,##0.00}", 45.09M, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol);
Console.WriteLine(s1);

string s2 = string.Format(@"{0:+;-}{1}{0:#,##0.00;#,##0.00}", -45.09M, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencySymbol);
Console.WriteLine(s2);

Outputs:

+£45.09
-£45.09
share|improve this answer
    
I think there is a smiley face somewhere in there. – AMissico Oct 16 '12 at 14:10

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