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So I was trying to print an array of ints in my program, and following these instructions Simplest way to print an array in Java

wrote the following code:

    int[] totals = //method that returns int array
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(totals));

But it wont compile saying that

"method toString in class Object cannot be applied to given types. required: no arguments found: int[] reason: actual and formal argument list differ in length"

Why does it do that? Do I not pass my array as an argument to toString? If not, how do I use toString?

Thank you!

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looks fine to me. Test with an array like this: int[] totals = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; –  pb2q Oct 16 '12 at 14:38
    
are you getting any other compiler errors or warnings? –  jalynn2 Oct 16 '12 at 14:43
    
No, I wasn't getting any other errors. But the two answers bellow helped me out. My main class was named Arrays (neubie mistake), so it was confused what I was referencing when I wrote Arrays.toString(totals). Thanks for the feedback! –  Levon Tamrazov Oct 16 '12 at 15:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

method toString in class Object cannot be applied to given types. required: no arguments found: int[] reason: actual and formal argument list differ in length

May be you have a variable named Arrays, that's why the compiler is complaining thinking that you are trying to invoke the Object.toString(), which doesn't take any argument.

Try

 System.out.println(java.util.Arrays.toString(totals)); 
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter! can you please comment on why the downvote? –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 16 '12 at 14:46
    
Maybe you have a variable named Arrays? Common! My answer was downvoter for less :) –  Lo Juego Oct 16 '12 at 14:55
    
As I just commented above I called the class for this program Arrays, so that's probably it. Thank you for your feedback! –  Levon Tamrazov Oct 16 '12 at 15:41
    
Also thank you for that workaround! I used it instead of having to rename the class. Worked like a charm! –  Levon Tamrazov Oct 16 '12 at 15:42
    
@LevonTamrazov: You are welcome. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 16 '12 at 15:46

The fact that it says "method toString in class Object cannot be applied to given types." makes me think you might not be importing the java.util.Arrays class properly, or you have some other object called Arrays.

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or rather: he's got a variable named Arrays: Object Arrays = null –  pb2q Oct 16 '12 at 14:43
    
Yes; clarified. –  Omaha Oct 16 '12 at 14:46
    
I called the class for this program Arrays. That must be it, so I'll just rename the class. Thank you! –  Levon Tamrazov Oct 16 '12 at 15:38

This works for me:

int[] totals = {1,2};
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(totals));

printing:

[1, 2]

Are you sure you use at least JDK 5 ?

Indeed, Arrays.toString(int[] a) only exists since JDK 5.

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Why dont you try ::

int[] totals = //method that returns int array
    System.out.println(totals.toString());
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3  
toString() on an array won't do anything useful: it just prints the reference for the array. The OP wants to use the Arrays class to print each value. –  pb2q Oct 16 '12 at 14:40
    
If you try this for arrays: it will print the comma separated data –  Sashi Kant Oct 16 '12 at 14:45
    
it won't. tried it enough times to know. did you? –  pb2q Oct 16 '12 at 14:45
    
Yeah I tried this as well before posting this question, it printed the memory address. –  Levon Tamrazov Oct 16 '12 at 15:36

Your method doesn't seem to init your array, try this:

int[] totals = new int[10]; //method that returns int array
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(totals));
share|improve this answer
    
If the array hadn't been initialised, I wouldn't expect the argument exception. –  Edd Oct 16 '12 at 15:31

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