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Consider the code below, taken from here. For this code, I get the following execution times:

time ./fibomp 40
Number of threads (OpenMP v200805): 2
finonacci(40) = 102334155

real    0m3.193s
user    0m3.180s
sys     0m0.000s

$ export OMP_NUM_THREADS=1
$ time ./fibomp 40
Number of threads (OpenMP v200805): 1
finonacci(40) = 102334155

real    0m3.224s
user    0m3.216s
sys     0m0.000s

So as you can see, there's not much speed up, definitely not the 2x speedup Ruud mentions in his Tue Nov 01, 2011 1:41 am email. I'm running this on a dual core machine (could that be it?). What am I doing wrong? (BTW, BONUS points, what is the ptime command? Some SPARC Unix command?)

long comp_fib_numbers(int n)
{
  long fnm1, fnm2, fn;
  if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ) return(n);

  // In case the sequence gets too short, execute the serial version
  if ( n < 20 )
  {
     return(comp_fib_numbers(n-1)+comp_fib_numbers(n-2));
  }
  else
  {
     #pragma omp task shared(fnm1)
       fnm1 = comp_fib_numbers(n-1);
     #pragma omp task shared(fnm2)
       fnm2 = comp_fib_numbers(n-2);
     #pragma omp taskwait
       fn = fnm1 + fnm2;
       return(fn);
   }

}
share|improve this question
    
I don't have problems with the code. Are you sure that you switched all possible optimization on? Are you sure that both cores are really enabled? –  Jens Gustedt Oct 16 '12 at 15:33
    
You mean you get the 2x speedup? Yes, both cores are enabled, but no, I have -O0... why would I need optimization for this, if you don't mind my asking? –  Dervin Thunk Oct 16 '12 at 15:35
    
Just tried with -O2, no change. –  Dervin Thunk Oct 16 '12 at 15:36
    
I have a bicore each with hyperthreading. I didn't measure the exact speedup but it looks quite good. I also have speedup with -O0 but much less visible. Optimization could influence the way that the function is organized, trashing the cashes, whatever. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 16 '12 at 15:37
    
@JensGustedt: I wonder what I'm doing wrong. At the beginning I thought maybe the OpenMP version didn't have tasks and so it was ignoring the #pragmas, but it's the May 2008 version which is 3.0 and therefore has tasks. I don't have HT. –  Dervin Thunk Oct 16 '12 at 15:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, just to be sure, since you state that htop shows that a single core is being used, make sure that you have enabled OpenMP support in your compiler. The option to do so is -fopen for GCC, -xopenmp for Sun/Oracle compilers and -openmp for Intel compilers.

Second of all, n = 20 might be too low of a cut off for the parallel implementation. A shameless plug - see this course material from a workshop on OpenMP that a colleague of mine gave some months ago. Several parallel versions with tasking are discussed there, starting from slide 20.

Third, ptime is a Solaris command, not specific to SPARC since it is also available in the x86 version. Many process related Solaris commands have the p prefix in their names. Note that in your case time is more likely to be the built-in implementation that Bash provides rather than the standalone binary.

Fourth, and may be the real answer to your question - you are missing a parallel region in your code so the task directives don't work at all :) You should rewrite your code as following:

long comp_fib_numbers(int n)
{
   long fnm1, fnm2, fn;
   if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ) return(n);

   // In case the sequence gets too short, execute the serial version
   if ( n < 20 )
   {
      return(comp_fib_numbers(n-1)+comp_fib_numbers(n-2));
   }
   else
   {
      #pragma omp parallel  // <--- You are missing this one parallel region
      {
         #pragma omp single
         {
            #pragma omp task shared(fnm1)
            fnm1 = comp_fib_numbers(n-1);
            #pragma omp task shared(fnm2)
            fnm2 = comp_fib_numbers(n-2);
         }
         #pragma omp taskwait
      }

      fn = fnm1 + fnm2;
      return(fn);
   }

}

You could make the code even more terse by using the if clause to switch of the parallel region:

long comp_fib_numbers(int n)
{
   long fnm1, fnm2, fn;
   if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ) return(n);

   #pragma omp parallel if(n >= 20)
   {
      #pragma omp single
      {
         #pragma omp task shared(fnm1)
         fnm1 = comp_fib_numbers(n-1);
         #pragma omp task shared(fnm2)
         fnm2 = comp_fib_numbers(n-2);
      }
      #pragma omp taskwait
   }

   fn = fnm1 + fnm2;
   return(fn);
}

If n happens to be less than 20, then the parallel region would execute single threaded. Since parallel regions are usually extracted in separate functions, there would still be an additional function call, unless the compiler choses to produce duplicate code. That's why it is recommended that the serial implementation is extracted in its own function:

long comp_fib_numbers_serial(int n)
{
   if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ) return(n);

   return (comp_fib_numbers_serial(n-1) + comp_fib_numbers_serial(n-2));
}

long comp_fib_numbers(int n)
{
   long fnm1, fnm2, fn;
   if ( n < 20 ) return comp_fib_numbers_serial(n);

   #pragma omp parallel
   {
      #pragma omp single
      {
         #pragma omp task shared(fnm1)
         fnm1 = comp_fib_numbers(n-1);
         #pragma omp task shared(fnm2)
         fnm2 = comp_fib_numbers(n-2);
      }
      #pragma omp taskwait
   }

   fn = fnm1 + fnm2;
   return(fn);
}

Edit: Now that I've looked at the code that you have linked to, I can see that the call to comp_fib_numbers is embedded into a parallel region. So just disregard my comment about the missing parallel region if you already have one in your code. I will leave it here just for completeness. Try tweaking the value at which the switch between the parallel and the serial version occurs. On modern processors it might be quite high and the example that you have seen is quite old. Also make sure that no dynamic teams are used by either setting the environment variable OMP_DYNAMIC to false (or to FALSE) or by calling omp_set_dynamic(0); someplace before the parallel region.

You haven't stated what your compiler is but mind that OpenMP 3.0 is supported by GCC since version 4.4, by Intel compilers since version 11.0, by Sun/Oracle compilers since version I_dont_know and is not supported at all by the Visual C/C++ compilers.

Observed speedup on an quad-socket Intel Xeon X7350 system (old pre-Nehalem system with FSB)

$ time OMP_NUM_THREADS=1 ./fib.x 40
finonacci(40) = 102334155
OMP_NUM_THREADS=1 ./fib.x 40  1.86s user 0.00s system 99% cpu 1.866 total
$ time OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40
finonacci(40) = 102334155
OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40  1.96s user 0.00s system 169% cpu 1.161 total

With the cut-off set to 25 (seems to be the optimal value for the X7350):

$ time OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40
finonacci(40) = 102334155
OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40  1.95s user 0.00s system 169% cpu 1.153 total

With the cut-off set to 25 and a separate function for the serial implementation:

$ time OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40
finonacci(40) = 102334155
OMP_NUM_THREADS=2 ./fib.x 40  1.52s user 0.00s system 171% cpu 0.889 total

See how the user time decreases by some 400 ms. This is because of the removed overhead.

These were measured with the code from the site that you have linked to. Used compiler is GCC 4.4.6 on a 64-bit Scientific Linux 6.2 system.

share|improve this answer
    
Hristo, wow, excellent answer, thank you. Very impressive. I tried to put in the #pragma omp parallel directive, but it tells me that error: invalid branch to/from an OpenMP structured block... Thanks again, though, just what I needed to start working on a solution. –  Dervin Thunk Oct 16 '12 at 17:16
    
I think that in the code snippet above the pragma omp task should be enclosed inside a single construct, otherwise all the threads passing will generate a new task. –  Massimiliano Oct 16 '12 at 17:41
    
@DervinThunk, my mistake - you cannot return from within a parallel block. Please stick with the original code that has the parallel region in the upper level function or move the return statement outside the region. –  Hristo Iliev Oct 16 '12 at 18:21
    
@Massimiliano, the code is correct. Tasks are queued and then executed by idle threads at certain synchronisation points like the taskwait construct. –  Hristo Iliev Oct 16 '12 at 18:24
2  
@HristoIliev I believe that the behavior of your code is different from the one intended: your code generate a number of task that is constant per-thread. Here the function with the orphaned task directives is called inside a single nowait construct. –  Massimiliano Oct 16 '12 at 18:31

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