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According to Python documentation, both dir() (without args) and locals() evaluates to the list of variables in something called local scope. First one returns list of names, second returns a dictionary of name-value pairs. Is it the only difference? Is this always valid?

assert dir() == sorted( locals().keys() )
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What problem are you trying to solve? Why do you need to know? –  phant0m Oct 16 '12 at 15:30
    
I need to know language architecture to write better code. Exact question is 'what function to use in order to check if some variable is defined in local scope'. –  Eye of Hell Oct 17 '12 at 9:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The output of dir() when called without arguments is almost same as locals(), but dir() returns a list of strings and locals() returns a dictionary and you can update that dictionary to add new variables.

dir(...)
    dir([object]) -> list of strings

    If called without an argument, return the names in the current scope.


locals(...)
    locals() -> dictionary

    Update and return a dictionary containing the current scope's local variables.

Type:

>>> type(locals())
<type 'dict'>
>>> type(dir())
<type 'list'>

Update or add new variables using locals():

In [2]: locals()['a']=2

In [3]: a
Out[3]: 2

using dir(), however, this doesn't work:

In [7]: dir()[-2]
Out[7]: 'a'

In [8]: dir()[-2]=10

In [9]: dir()[-2]
Out[9]: 'a'

In [10]: a
Out[10]: 2
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Due to the way Python optimizes access to local variables in functions, it is often not possible to change local variables using the locals() dictionary, which is why the documentation warns against it. –  kindall Oct 16 '12 at 15:46
    
@kindall is right -- you should consider locals() read-only. –  DSM Oct 17 '12 at 10:34

Exact question is 'what function to use in order to check if some variable is defined in local scope'.

Accessing an undefined variable in Python raises an exception:

>>> undefined
NameError: name 'undefined' is not defined

Just like any other exception, you can catch it:

try:
    might_exist
except NameError:
    # Variable does not exist
else:
    # Variable does exist

I need to know language architecture to write better code.

That won't make your code better. You should never get yourself into a situation where such a thing is required, it's almost always the wrong approach.

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