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I've a Tuple class which has:

private class Tuple {
    private int fileno;
    private int position;

    public Tuple(int fileno, int position) {
        this.fileno = fileno;
        this.position = position;
    }
}

I also have an hashmap which refrences this list like

    Map<String, List<Tuple>> index = new HashMap<String, List<Tuple>>();

Now there is a scenario where i need to count how many words in a file: The data is as follows:

abc 10.txt
abc 10.txt
abc 10.txt
abc 12.txt
abc 12.txt
ghost 15.txt
and so on....

Now how to count number of occurences of the above? It is easy but i've been coding so long and also new to java. I also learnt duplicates can't go into hashmap! Thanks.

To add data to list:

List<Tuple> idx = index.get(word);
                            if (idx == null) {
                                idx = new LinkedList<Tuple>();
                                index.put(word, idx);
                            }
                            idx.add(new Tuple(fileno, pos));

Above code just dumps the data, Now i will compare with words from a string array[]. All i need at end is like this: abc 10.txt count - 3 abc 12.txt count - 2 ghost 15.txt count - 1

I'm not sure if map helps/i need to use a list again/write a function to do this? Thanks!

I solved the above problem with simple condition statements! Thanks @codeguru

/*
                     consider all cases and update wc as along
                     Lesson learnt - Map does not handle duplicates
                                    - List does not work
                                    - spend half a day figuring out 
                     */
                    if(wordInstance == null && fileNameInstance == null) {
                          wordInstance = wordOccurence;
                          fileNameInstance = files.get(t.fileno);
                    }
                    if(wordInstance == wordOccurence && fileNameInstance ==files.get(t.fileno)) {
                          wc++;
                    }
                    if(wordInstance == wordOccurence && fileNameInstance !=files.get(t.fileno)) {
                        wc=0;
                        fileNameInstance = files.get(t.fileno);
                        wc++;
                    }
                    if(wordInstance != wordOccurence && fileNameInstance ==files.get(t.fileno)) {
                        wc=0;
                        wordInstance = wordOccurence;
                        wc++;
                    }
share|improve this question
1  
I can't understand the use of your Tuple class. Can you explain a little bit more? –  Rohit Jain Oct 16 '12 at 15:50
1  
Maybe you can show the code filling the map as I'm not sure if I understand your question? –  home Oct 16 '12 at 15:50
    
The role of the Tuple class is unclear. What have you tried for counting? It's fairly obvious how to count words using a HashMap<String, Integer> in java... –  Anony-Mousse Oct 16 '12 at 15:57
    
i edited above post. –  Abhilash Muthuraj Oct 16 '12 at 16:03
    
Let me rephrase it and see if I can understand it: - You have a number of files composed of words; - You have a list of words for which you want to know the number of occurrences at a file and global level. Question is - what is the optimal data structure / algorithm to accomplish this? Is that correct? –  Alessandro Santini Oct 16 '12 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you may be making this more complicated than it needs to be. I suggest that you take a step back from the computer. First you should take a simple input example and work out, by hand, what the output should be. Next, write a few sentences (in your native language) describing the steps you took to work out this output. From there, you need to refine your description until you can easily translate it into Java.

share|improve this answer
    
The Map will still not compute the sum then. –  Anony-Mousse Oct 16 '12 at 15:56
    
equals() and hashCode() –  Alessandro Santini Oct 16 '12 at 15:56
    
@Anony-Mousse Sorry, my original answer was based on a misunderstanding of the question. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 16 '12 at 16:15
    
@Alessandro Yes, I had a brief lapse. Even so, my original answer wasn't a good solution for the question. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 16 '12 at 16:16
1  
@Code-Guru thanks, i took a white paper and solved this logic! sometimes a person just needs a time off the computer! –  Abhilash Muthuraj Oct 16 '12 at 17:17

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