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After running the following:

#include <stdio.h>
class Nil
{
};

int main()
{
    Nil* A[20];
    char* B[20];
    for (int i=0;i!=20;i++)
    {
        A[i]=new Nil;
    }

    for (int i=0;i!=19;i++)
    {
        printf("A:%i\n",((int)A[i+1])-((int)A[i]));
    }
    printf("------------------------------------\n",5);
    for (int i=0;i!=20;i++)
    {
        B[i]=new char;
    }

    for (int i=0;i!=19;i++)
    {
        printf("B:%i\n",((int)B[i+1])-((int)B[i]));
    }
    getchar();
}

OUTPUT:

A:7112
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
A:64
------------------------------------
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64
B:64

why is the allocation size always 64?

NOTE: If you dont like the question formating then DONT LOCK IT so i can't fix it. the v2 was added because the previous version was locked and now theres an empty question and a duplicate. C++ Memory Allocation of Class Nil

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2  
Post the output please to make this a complete question. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 16 '12 at 16:37
    
What bool are you talking about? – tadman Oct 16 '12 at 16:40
    
i would change it to char but Lightness blocked my post so i cant update it :/ – Lauer Oct 16 '12 at 16:46
    
@user1204406 - nobody has blocked your post :) Try again. – Kiril Kirov Oct 16 '12 at 16:53
    
aww crap now theres2 – Lauer Oct 16 '12 at 16:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

C++ memory manager handles allocations as it pleases. The gaps are larger than the objects because the manager needs additional information to know what memory is taken and what is free. All the chunks have the same size thanks to memory padding, for greater efficiency. Notice that should you try allocating large objects, the gaps would widen, most likely by multiples of 64. The gaps between allocated objects are the same, because you allocated them in a sequence - stacking new objects is the most simple allocation strategy. Notice that if the allocations weren't in sequence or if there were 'holes' of free memory, the gaps would not be so even.

The important thing to remember is that all of this is implementation and platform dependent and should not be relied on.

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You are holding array of pointers there. Pointers does have a fixed size, so it's always the same.

For the allocated memory, the compiler does some optimizations. Normaly you could not lookup a single bit or byte, so the most compilers take care that you have optimal access patterns.

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