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We know from c++ 11(also true in c++98/03 standard) standard(see below), we cannot try to replace the operator new function - placement form in global space as it has already been defined.

18.6.1.3 Placement forms [new.delete.placement]

These functions are reserved, a C++ program may not define functions that displace the versions in the Standard C++ library (17.6.4). The provisions of (3.7.4) do not apply to these reserved placement forms of operator new and operator delete.

This has been proven by point 2> in the snippet below, compile error as expected.

But I can still override the placement new in class level,that works fine, see point (2) in snippet below. Why is that? Shouldn't compile should try to prevent (2) as well according to standard ???

See my snippet below:

class Test
{
public:
    Test(int i):m_i(i) { cout << "Test::Test()" << endl; }
    ~Test() { cout << "Test::~Test()" << endl; }

    //(1)class level override placement new
    void* operator new (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) {
        cout << "My class level new" << endl;
        return malloc(size);
    }

    //(2)class level override placement new
    void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) throw() {
        cout << "My class level non-throwing placement new" << endl;
        return ptr;
    }
private:
    int m_i;

};

//<1>global replacement for operator new - single object form
void* operator new (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) {
    cout << "My global new" << endl;
    return malloc(size);
}


//<2>global replacement for operator new - replcement  form
//NB. This is a attempt that definitely fails according to c++ stadnard:
//does get compile error: error: redefinition of 'void* operator new(std::size_t, void*)'
/*
void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) throw() {
    cout << "My global non-throwing placement new" << endl;
    return ptr;
}
*/

int main() {
    Test* p = new Test(1);
    delete p;

    cout << "" << endl;
    void* mem = operator new(sizeof(Test));
    Test* p2 = new(mem) Test(1);
    p2->~Test();
    operator delete (mem);

    return 0;
}

Below is output as expected:

My class level new
My global new
Test::Test()
Test::~Test()

My global new
My class level non-throwing placement new
Test::Test()
Test::~Test()

================================================================================== Further clarification for my question:

18.6.1.3 Placement forms These functions are reserved, a C++ program may not define functions that displace the versions in the Standard C++ library (17.6.4). The provisions of (3.7.4) do not apply to these reserved placement forms

of operator new and operator delete.

This explains the expected compile error at point <2> in my snippet, so this one is ok.

But why I can displace the placement forms in the class level at point (2) inside the class clarification?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

§18.6.1.3 lists the following forms:

void* operator new(std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept;
void* operator new[](std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept;
void operator delete(void* ptr, void*) noexcept;
void operator delete[](void* ptr, void*) noexcept;

The rule that "a C++ program may not define functions that displace the versions in the Standard C++ library" applies only to these four function declarations, which are not in any namespace. If you make your own version in a class or a namespace, that's fine.

In fact, sometimes you have to provide your own placement new. If you declare a normal operator new in your class, it will hide the placement new provided by the standard library, and you'll need to add your own placement new in the class if you ever want to use the new (ptr) T(...) syntax.

This simply provides a guarantee that the call ::new (ptr) T(...) is guaranteed to behave like the standard placement new. (Note the :: prefix.)

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I can in fact provide a displace for non placement new in global space, see my snippet above. And the non placement new can also be define in side class as well. I know your point about placement new being hide by non placement new inside class, but that's not answering my question... –  Gob00st Oct 17 '12 at 15:38
    
@Gob00st Non-placement new is explicitly allowed to be displaced in the global namespace (a violation of the normal rules about functions). That's what the bit you're quoting is specifically an exception from. –  John Calsbeek Oct 17 '12 at 20:56
    
Why I had a compile error when try to displace the the placement form in global namespace ? And it's ok to displace the non placement version no compile error. –  Gob00st Oct 17 '12 at 23:08
    
Am I missing something here I am confused ... –  Gob00st Oct 17 '12 at 23:10
    
@Gob00st You had a compile error trying to displacement form because the standard says you can't displace it. You didn't have a compile error displacing the normal version because the standard says you're allowed to displace it. There's no critical thinking needed here other than "that's what the standard says." –  John Calsbeek Oct 18 '12 at 4:26

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