Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class B (implementation of INotifyPropertyChanged) that monitors for events. It sits inside a class A that receives the event notifications. The events class B generates can often be very frequent, so I'd like to:

  1. Run the code for class A on a thread ThA (not interacting with containing class, B)

  2. Run the code for class B on a thread ThB, and when an event occurs, before notifying the containing class A of the event (by doing an invoke on the dispatcher for ThA?), it checks that ThA is not in use by class A. This way, I would keep it so that only ThA runs inside A, and also avoid overwhelming ThA with notifications from class B (info from class B will create events for class A "only when ThA has time").

So it might look something like this -

public class A
{
     private B b
     private Thread ThA

     public A
     {
         b= new B(ThA);
         b.PropertyChanged+=..
     }

     Event1 callback running on ThA
     Event2 callback running on ThA
     Callback for b (invoked in ThA)
}

public class B : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
       private Thread ThA
       private Thread ThB

       public B(ThA_)
       {
            ThA=ThA_;
       }

       private void EventInClassB_Updated(object sender, Args e)
       {
            if (ThA is not being used for anything)
            {
                DispatcherForThreadA.invoke( notifyPropertyChanged() ); //send the callback to class A
            }
       }

}

Does anyone know if there is a smarter way to do this, and if not, how I might encode "ThA is not being used for anything"?

Thanks! Chris

share|improve this question
    
btw, subsrubing for event in constructor is a BAD thing in multhithreded environment: you are exposing your non-constructed object to external world, which can use it at the same time! –  undefined Oct 16 '12 at 17:05

1 Answer 1

You could use a Monitor or a Mutex to control access to ThA. Simply call Monitor.TryEnter to get the lock. If TryEnter fails, then ThA is in use. Be sure to call Monitor.Exit when ThA is done.

The code for using a Mutex would be similar. In general, the Monitor will perform better, but it can't be used across app domain boundaries.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.