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I have a document collection in RavenDB around which the client application performs relatively straight-forward CRUD. There is one simple map-only index in play to query the collection.

I now have to add a feature to the application that will display the count of the number of times an individual document has been retrieved in a query ie 'served' by the application. Such that when you view an individual document through the application you can see number of times it has been served. Also requested is a 'Reset' button to set the count back to zero, then allow the count to continue increasing.

The requirement is being kept deliberately crude in order to reduce the complexity of the application interface. The option of a date range report has been discussed and is considered unnecessary.

Some context: The incremented served count of some documents is likely to exceed 10 thousand per day. A 'reset' of the document served count can be expected to occur weekly. I should be able to achieve the incrementing write to the database asynchronously, outside of the query operation - in a CQRS fashion.

I can think of three approaches and wondered what the best option is?

  1. Add a integer Count property to the document object, to be incremented on each object when the call to increment the object is subsequently made. This would keep document size low.

  2. Add a List property to the document object of the current date, to be appended to on each object similarly to option 1. This would be useful later if/when a date-based report is requested but documents could get dangerously large?

  3. Add a separate collection of 'counter' documents which would comprise of the served document id and the datetime that it was served. I gather that this would reap the benefit of a map/reduce index?

And a couple of early follow-up questions...

  • Is there an aspect-oriented way to achieve this with RavenDB?
  • Is there any performance benefit by using an Update (option 1 + 2) over an Insert (option 3) or vice-versa?

Thank you for answers and for reading all this!

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2 Answers 2

An aspect-oriented way to achieve this with RavenDB is with the use of a read trigger. You can store the retrieval count in the document metadata. This would be the most performant solution since information about individual retrievals isn't required.

UPDATE

As pointed out by maxbeaudoin, metadata is a fitting place for a read counter because it is data about data. Also, it will perform well since meta data is stored together with the document. This describes how to work with metadata in RavenDB.

UPDATE 2

If you are only storing the count, then metadata is the best option for performance and practicality. If you need to store each view event and you anticipate thousands of potential view events for each document then I'd store the view events in a separate document, not in the same document or document meta-data. Meta-data is just a collection of key-value pairs and isn't meant for large collections. The reasons not to store in the same document are that you'd have to alter the document model to contain the view events, which will pollute your model and also because, as you pointed out, retrieving a document with 10K view events will be IO heaving and cause performance issues. You can use a projection to retrieve only specific document fields, but then the returned document won't be tracked for changes. Given the trouble, I'd recommend you reconsider not storing individual read events unless you absolutely need them.

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Doesn't quite get to the bottom of how/where I should store the data other than alluding to document metadata which may or may not be a good fit. But thanks for alerting me to the read trigger. –  Nick Oct 17 '12 at 22:59
    
A common definition for metadata is: "data about data." Perfect fit. The read trigger is the right place for such logic. –  maxbeaudoin Oct 18 '12 at 18:51
    
Whilst I agree that metadata is a good fit as a View Count does indeed tell you something about the document, my concern is more about practicality and performance. I am leaning towards storing each View event as an element inside an array belonging to the document (or document metadata). Now if each document holds over 10K view events, how will that effect the load time for a single document? With numbers of this size, am I reaching a threshold that would make it more efficient to store the View event in it's own collection? –  Nick Oct 18 '12 at 21:24
    
An important point is that the View Count will not need to be returned every time the document is accessed, but only when a certain index is used to query the collection. Is this efficiency issue therefore solved by segregating indexes? i.e. an index that does not map the View Count field will not be effected by that's fields count/vector length? –  Nick Oct 18 '12 at 21:30
1  
Metadat is returned as part of the document, so calling session.Advanced.GetMetadataFor accesses the metadata that is already part of the session object and doesn't incur an additional call. Therefore, you can return a collection of documents and retrieve metadata for each without performance penalty. –  eulerfx Oct 19 '12 at 16:51

Perhaps I am way off base here, but why would you want to actually load this document from the database 10k times per day? You would probably be better off with some output caching.

Raven caching is also going to work in your favor. I must admit, I am uncertain as to if a read trigger will still fire on the server if a cache hit happens on the client. If you do go down a triggers path, I would verify this first.

Perhaps it would be better to keep a counter going on the client side. You could increment the counter even when you get a cache hit and don't touch raven. Then periodically, you can flush the counter back to the server to update a count property either on the document itself, or in a separate stats document.

This would really help with performance. Say you had 50 views over 5 minutes. Why increment by 1 every time, just increment by 50 every 5 minutes. Well, not 50 exactly, but whatever you metered on the front end over that time. This would scale even with multiple servers, and you could apply the change via raven's patching API if you were just adding the new count to the existing one.

UPDATE

I put together an example that might help you. This has everything you need to do it client side, except some timer that comes along periodically. Hopefully this is worthy of your bounty.

public class Counter
{
    // Uses the Multithreaded Singleton pattern
    // See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650316.aspx

    private Counter() { }

    private static volatile Counter _instance;
    private static readonly object SyncRoot = new object();

    public static Counter Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance != null)
                return _instance;

            lock (SyncRoot)
            {
                if (_instance == null)
                    _instance = new Counter();
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }

    private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<string, long> _readCounts =
                                         new ConcurrentDictionary<string, long>();

    public void Increment(string documentId)
    {
        _readCounts.AddOrUpdate(documentId, k => 1, (k, v) => v + 1);
    }

    public long ReadAndReset(string documentId)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            long count;
            return _readCounts.TryRemove(documentId, out count) ? count : 0;
        }
    }

    public IDictionary<string, long> ReadAndResetAll()
    {
        var docs = _readCounts.Keys.ToList();
        return docs.ToDictionary(x => x, ReadAndReset);
    }
}

public class Story
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Author { get; set; }
    public DateTime Published { get; set; }
    public long ReadCount { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }
}

[TestClass]
public class Tests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestCounter()
    {
        var documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080" };
        documentStore.Initialize();

        documentStore.DatabaseCommands.EnsureDatabaseExists("Test");

        using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession("Test"))
        {
            var story = new Story
                {
                    Id = "stories/1",
                    Title = "A long walk home",
                    Author = "Miss de Bus",
                    Published = new DateTime(2012, 1, 1),
                    Content = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit."
                };
            session.Store(story);
            session.SaveChanges();
        }

        // This simulates many clients reading the document in separate sessions simultaneously
        Parallel.For(0, 1000, i =>
            {
                using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession("Test"))
                {
                    var story = session.Load<Story>("stories/1");
                    Counter.Instance.Increment(story.Id);
                }
            });

        // This is what you will need to do periodically on a timer event
        var counts = Counter.Instance.ReadAndResetAll();
        var db = documentStore.DatabaseCommands.ForDatabase("Test");
        foreach (var count in counts)
            db.Patch(count.Key, new[]
                {
                    new PatchRequest
                        {
                            Type = PatchCommandType.Inc,
                            Name = "ReadCount",
                            Value = count.Value
                        }
                });

        using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession("Test"))
        {
            var story = session.Load<Story>("stories/1");
            Assert.AreEqual(1000, story.ReadCount);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are quite correct about caching. I am steering away from the read trigger also as I will be incrementing the count asynchronously as the need to update the read count depends on further conditions. However the question still remains as to whether it would be better to store a collection of view events (on the document or in its own collection) or a just simple count. Still, good shout on storing the count in memory and using the patching api. –  Nick Oct 19 '12 at 16:47
    
Another thought I had, assuming your requests are coming from the web, you may want to keep a ConcurrentDictionary where the key is the document id and the value is the count since last updated. Then periodically you could just grab the values, reset them to zero and save the values back to the database. Whether you put it in the document or in a separate view event is more about if you want the user getting the document to see the count or not. –  Matt Johnson Oct 19 '12 at 18:45
    
I updated my answer with a sample to show you how this can be done efficiently. Simply add a timer in your app somewhere that invokes ReadAndResetAll the way I show in the sample. –  Matt Johnson Oct 24 '12 at 16:11
    
I updated it one last time to use Raven's patching API when updating the read counts. This is the most efficient way to deal with this kind of update. –  Matt Johnson Oct 24 '12 at 16:38
    
Many thanks for the detailed answer. I like the Patching approach and also the asynchronous counter increment. I've looked into using Phil Haack's WebBackgrounder to achieve it. Congrats on the Bounty! :-) –  Nick Oct 25 '12 at 13:53

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