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I am trying to add UIRefreshControl for IOS 6.

#define SYSTEM_VERSION_LESS_THAN_OR_EQUAL_TO(v)     ([[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] compare:v options:NSNumericSearch] != NSOrderedDescending)

if(SYSTEM_VERSION_GREATER_THAN_OR_EQUAL_TO(@"6.0")) {
    UIRefreshControl *refresh = [[UIRefreshControl alloc] init];
    refresh.attributedTitle = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Pull to Refresh"];
    [refresh addTarget:self action:@selector(refreshView:)
      forControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];
    self.refreshControl = refresh;
}

and

if (NSClassFromString(@"UIRefreshControl") != Nil) {
    UIRefreshControl *refresh = [[UIRefreshControl alloc] init];
    refresh.attributedTitle = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Pull to Refresh"];
    [refresh addTarget:self action:@selector(refreshView:)
      forControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];
    self.refreshControl = refresh;
}

but getting the error

dyld: Symbol not found: _OBJC_CLASS_$_UIRefreshControl
Referenced from: /Users/office/Library/Application Support/iPhone    Simulator/4.3.2/Applications/DD532E42-77F9-471C-AA48-7F9EAE9268C6/Verizon.app/Verizon
Expected in:   /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneSimulator.platform/Developer/SDKs/i PhoneSimulator4.3.sdk/System/Library/Frameworks/UIKit.framework/UIKit

i am using IOS 6 SDK and running on iPhone 4.3 Simulator.

When i remove the code

    UIRefreshControl *refresh = [[UIRefreshControl alloc] init];
    refresh.attributedTitle = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Pull to Refresh"];
    [refresh addTarget:self action:@selector(refreshView:)
      forControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];
    self.refreshControl = refresh;

everything works for iPhone 4.3 Simulator. Interestingly code inside

if(SYSTEM_VERSION_GREATER_THAN_OR_EQUAL_TO(@"6.0")) {  }

never gets called when on iPhone 4.3 Simulator, not sure why the error. Please Help!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Definitely go with the second style, i.e.:

if (NSClassFromString(@"UIRefreshControl") != nil) {
    ...
}

As for the error you are getting, you should be able to stop that by setting UIKit to "Optional" within the "Link binary with libraries" section of the project's "Build Phases" settings.

It should mark it as optional for you as it notices you're using a class that's only available in iOS 6, but looks like it's not in your case for some reason.

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This will still cause dyld to choke on the unresolved symbol. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 17:25
    
No, it won't. I've just tested it and it works fine for me. –  mattjgalloway Oct 16 '12 at 17:30
    
thank you mattjgalloway, it worked for me. thx a lot –  Deepak ML Oct 16 '12 at 17:38
    
No problem :-). –  mattjgalloway Oct 16 '12 at 17:39
    
@mattjgalloway if the code refers to the nonexistent symbol anywhere, regardless of whether it is in an if or not, then dyld will not be able to resolve the symbol. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 17:39

Nevermind the code doesn't get called - when the application loads, the dynamic linker needs to resolve all the symbols in the dynamic libraries the app's binary is linked to. In iOS 4.3, the UIRefreshControl class is not implemented, so on devices running this OS (and any OS earlier than iOS 6) the operating system itself (well, rather its UIKit framework) doesn't contain the class and the symbol corresponding to it, so the application can't even start, even if it doesn't use the code suited for iOS6-only.

You also need to know that preprocessor macros are evaluated at compile time, and if your target is iOS 6, the code that you conditionally compile gets compiled and the system will try to execute that regardless of what version of iOS you're running the program on.

The solution: instead of using conditional compilation, use reflection and self-introspection to find out if the class is available at runtime:

Class UIRefreshControl_Class;
if ((UIRefreshControl_Class = objc_getClass("UIRefreshControl")) != Nil) {
    // class available
    id control = [[UIRefreshControl_class alloc] init];
    // etc.
}
share|improve this answer
    
The preprocessor macro is evaluated at compile time, yes. Well, before compilation actually. In the preprocessor step. But it most certainly will not execute the code and compile in the if statement anyway. If that's what you're trying to say? –  mattjgalloway Oct 16 '12 at 17:29
    
Basically, no, it will not try to execute the code regardless of what version of iOS you're running on. It will compile in the if statement just as it is, with the macro expanded first. –  mattjgalloway Oct 16 '12 at 17:31
    
@mattjgalloway well, it depends on what kind of 'system version' that macro detects. If it's the actual system version the actual device runs, then it won't. If it's the version of the deployment target, then it will. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 17:31
    
No no NO. It will expand the macro to yield the if statement as this: if ([[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] compare:@"6.0" options:NSNumericSearch] != NSOrderedDescending) { ... }. This will not be evaluated by the compiler, as it simply cannot be. –  mattjgalloway Oct 16 '12 at 17:32
    
@mattjgalloway the macro will be expanded by the preprocessor, no error here. I'm also right about the conditional compilation part. Of course if the macro expands to the code you just mentioned, then it won't be executed, but this still doesn't solve the problem, for the reasons I described. –  user529758 Oct 16 '12 at 17:34

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