Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Okay so I am having trouble with this maybe i have just been thinking too long or am dumb but here is what i have and what i am trying to do:

Update- code all fixed no more run problems.

public class myClass program {
   int [] w = null;
   int [] x = null;
   Thread T = null;
   public static void main(String [] args){
    x = new int[5];
    w = new int[5];

 // here i am trying to invoke a new thread passing the index
 // of my array, then incrementing the index each time i create a new thread
 // the purpose is to fill each index each time the new thread runs.

    for(int i = 0; i < w.length; i ++){
      // T = new Thread(new myThreadClass(w[i])); // only passes 0 take this out and 
      T = new Thread( new myThreadClass(i));      // pass i so the position changes
      T.start();
      try{
        Thread.sleep(100);
        }catch(Exception e){}

   }
}

in my separate class myThreadClass.java i have the following:

public class myThreadClass extends Thread{
 int [] w = null;
 int position = 0;
 int value = 1;

  public myThreadClass(int p){
    this.position = p
    w = myClass.w;
  }

  @Override
  public void run(){
   // synchronize the thread so there is no memory cache problems
   //
   synchronized(w){
      w[position] = value;
   }
  }

}

when i print out the output of w from myClass:

i get w = 1 0 0 0 0

but i want w = 1 1 1 1 1

EDITED- i am now getting the right output - check the code for changes

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In this part myThreadClass(w[i]) you are not passing an index, you are passing a value, which is zero because w is an array of 5 elements, all of them initialized with the default value of 0.

You should do myThreadClass(i) instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man. Turns out all I had to do is t = new Thread( new myThreadClass(i)) I knew it was something really simple. Thanks again –  inner_class7 Oct 16 '12 at 17:50
    
+1 for the real issue Dan. :-) –  Gray Oct 16 '12 at 17:58

w[] is initially all ZERO. you are passing one of these values to the thread constructor

share|improve this answer

This line from myClass:

w = new int[5];

initializes all the elements of w to 0.

so, when you call

T = new Thread( new myThreadClass(w[i]));

your are effectively doing this:

T = new Thread( new myThreadClass(0));

so the only element of w[] that will ever change is the first one.

share|improve this answer
    
yepp i am including the fix now. Thanks for your input turns out i just have to pass the int i = 0; by T = new Thread(new myThreadClass(i)); –  inner_class7 Oct 16 '12 at 17:55
    
Wow. Did not know about word tearing @Jay. I've verified it from example code. I have no idea how the JVM implements this. Thanks for the education. –  Gray Oct 16 '12 at 18:42

Here's an over-engineered solution for your problem. You could do just fine without encapsulation, but I decided to use it because it makes the example more readable.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Create the resultset containing the result
        ResultSet resultSet = new ResultSet(5);
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[resultSet.getSize()];

        // Create threads
        for (int i = 0; i < resultSet.getSize(); i++) {
            threads[i] = new Thread(new TestTask(
                    resultSet.createResultSetter(i)));
        }

        // Start threads
        for (int i = 0; i < resultSet.getSize(); i++) {
            threads[i].start();
        }

        // Wait until threads complete
        for (int i = 0; i < resultSet.getSize(); i++) {
            try {
                threads[i].join();
            } catch (InterruptedException exception) {
                // ??!
            }
        }

        // Print the result
        for (int i = 0; i < resultSet.getSize(); i++) {
            System.out.println(resultSet.getResult(i));
        }
    }

    /**
     * Interface used to set the result
     */
    public static interface ResultSetter {
        public void setResult(int result);
    }

    /**
     * Container class for results
     */
    public static class ResultSet {
        private final int[] results;

        public ResultSet(int size) {
            results = new int[size];
        }

        public int getSize() {
            return results.length;
        }

        public ResultSetter createResultSetter(final int position) {
            return new ResultSetter() {
                public void setResult(int result) {
                    ResultSet.this.setResult(position, result);
                }
            };
        }

        public synchronized int getResult(int position) {
            return results[position];
        }

        public synchronized void setResult(int position, int result) {
            results[position] = result;
        }
    }

    /**
     * A task executed by a thread
     */
    public static class TestTask implements Runnable {
        private ResultSetter resultSetter;

        public TestTask(ResultSetter resultSetter) {
            this.resultSetter = resultSetter;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            resultSetter.setResult(1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.