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How do I call ::std::make_shared on a class with only protected or private constructors?

I want to create a shared pointer to a class, and have a factory method that returns it while keeping the constructor\destructor protected. since the shared pointer can't access the the constructor or the destructor, I get compiler errors.

I am using llvm 4.1, but I am looking for a solution that can be compiler independent (besides making the constructor\destructor public).

this is a code sample:

class Foo
{
public:
    static std::shared_ptr<Foo> getSharedPointer()
    {
        return std::make_shared<Foo>();
    }

protected:
    Foo(int x){}
    ~Foo(){}

};

any Ideas?

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marked as duplicate by interjay, ildjarn, Praetorian, Jonathan Wakely, Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 16 '12 at 18:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

You can make a custom deleter that has access to the destructor.

For the constructor you can have a public constructor that cannot be used without access to some private tag type.

class Foo {
 private:
   struct this_is_private {};

   struct deleter {
       void operator()(Foo* ptr) const {
           delete ptr;
       }
   }

 public:
   explicit Foo(const this_is_private &, int x) : Foo(x) {}

   static ::std::shared_ptr<Foo> getSharedPointer() {
      return ::std::make_shared<Foo>(this_is_private{}, deleter{});
   }

 protected:
    Foo(int x){}
    ~Foo(){}
};
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But you can create the object using whatever means and then do return std::shared_ptr<Foo>(pFoo); instead of using make_shared. –  rodrigo Oct 16 '12 at 17:58
1  
@rodrigo, make_shared is more efficient, there are good reasons to prefer it –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 16 '12 at 18:00

Just allocate the pointer yourself instead of calling make_shared:

static std::shared_ptr<Foo> getSharedPointer()
{
    return std::shared_ptr<Foo>(new Foo);
}

Note, however, that this would require making the destructor public.

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1  
this may solve the constructor error, but not the destructor. also it has performance issues since it will perform an extra memory allocation –  danny Oct 16 '12 at 18:03
1  
There are good reasons to use make_shared including fewer heap allocations and better locality of reference. –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 16 '12 at 18:04
    
@danny please describe the extra memory allocation. –  syplex Oct 16 '12 at 18:07
    
@syplex shared_ptr also needs to do some bookkeeping for the tracked type (e.g. number of other shared_ptr / weak_ptr) pointing to the object. With your code there's the allocation for Foo and an extra one for this additional info. With make_shared there's be a single allocation call made for sizeof(Foo) + sizeof(BookkeepingInfo) –  Praetorian Oct 16 '12 at 18:09
1  
@Jonathan Wakely the OP didn't specify using make_shared as a requirement, only using shared_ptr. While you may be correct in the shortcomings, this solution seems much more clear and straightforward. –  syplex Oct 16 '12 at 18:13

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