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I am attempting to understand the logic in the data.table from the documentation and a bit unclear. I know I can just try this and see what happens but I would like to make sure that there is no pathological case and therefore would like to know how the logic was actually coded. When two data.table objects have a different number of key columns, for example a has 2 and b has 3, and you run c <- a[b], will a and b be merged simply on the first two key columns or will the third column in a be automatically merged to the 3rd key column in b? An example:

require(data.table)
a <- data.table(id=1:10, t=1:20, v=1:40, key=c("id", "t"))
b <- data.table(id=1:10, v2=1:20, key="id")
c <- a[b]

This should select rows of a that match the id key column in b. For example, for id==1 in b, there are 2 rows in b and 4 rows in a that should generate 8 rows in c. This is indeed what seems to happen:

> head(c,10)
    id  t  v v2
 1:  1  1  1  1
 2:  1  1 21  1
 3:  1 11 11  1
 4:  1 11 31  1
 5:  1  1  1 11
 6:  1  1 21 11
 7:  1 11 11 11
 8:  1 11 31 11
 9:  2  2  2  2
10:  2  2 22  2

The other way to try it is to do:

d <-b[a]

This should do the same thing: for every row in a it should select the matching row in b: since a has an extra key column, t, that column should not be used for matching and a join based only on the first key column, id should be done. It seems like this is the case:

> head(d,10)
    id v2  t  v
 1:  1  1  1  1
 2:  1 11  1  1
 3:  1  1  1 21
 4:  1 11  1 21
 5:  1  1 11 11
 6:  1 11 11 11
 7:  1  1 11 31
 8:  1 11 11 31
 9:  2  2  2  2
10:  2 12  2  2

Can someone confirm? To be clear: is the third key column of a ever used in any of the merges or does data.table only use the min(length(key(DT))) of the two tables.

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If you showed what you tried and what you think is going on, and then just asked for confirmation that what you're inferring is in fact how it works, I'd be a lot more excited about this question. –  GSee Oct 16 '12 at 18:13
    
good idea! let me do that –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 18:14
    
@GSee: done, do you think is outlines what I'm trying to understand ok? –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 18:29
    
So your question is: does this output match what you described? I'd say yes. The merges are happening exactly as you describe. The sorting order is different both rows and columns because of the different columns in a and b and due to the way recycling works. i.e. the difference between rep(1:10, 10) and rep(1:10, each=10) –  Justin Oct 16 '12 at 19:22
    
As I read it, it says, "if there is more than one key, is only the first used?" –  GSee Oct 16 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Good question. First the correct terminology is (from ?data.table) :

[A data.table] may have one key of one or more columns. This key can be used for row indexing instead of rownames.

So "key" (singlular) not "keys" (plural). We can get away with "keys", currently. But when secondary keys are added in future, there may then be multiple keys. Each key (singular) can have multiple columns (plural).

Otherwise you're absolutely correct. The following paragraph was improved in v1.8.2 based on feedback from others also confused. From ?data.table:

When i is a data.table, x must have a key. i is joined to x using x's key and the rows in x that match are returned. An equi-join is performed between each column in i to each column in x's key; i.e., column 1 of i is matched to the 1st column of x's key, column 2 to the second, etc. The match is a binary search in compiled C in O(log n) time. If i has fewer columns than x's key then many rows of x will ordinarily match to each row of i since not all of x's key columns will be joined to (a common use case). If i has more columns than x's key, the columns of i not involved in the join are included in the result. If i also has a key, it is i's key columns that are used to match to x's key columns (column 1 of i's key is joined to column 1 of x's key, column 2 to column 2, and so on) and a binary merge of the two tables is carried out. In all joins the names of the columns are irrelevant. The columns of x's key are joined to in order, either from column 1 onwards of i when i is unkeyed, or from column 1 onwards of i's key.


Following comments, in v1.8.3 (on R-Forge) this now reads (changes in bold) :

When i is a data.table, x must have a key. i is joined to x using x's key and the rows in x that match are returned. An equi-join is performed between each column in i to each column in x's key; i.e., column 1 of i is matched to the 1st column of x's key, column 2 to the second, etc. The match is a binary search in compiled C in O(log n) time. If i has fewer columns than x's key then not all of x's key columns will be joined to (a common use case) and many rows of x will (ordinarily) match to each row of i. If i has more columns than x's key, the columns of i not involved in the join are included in the result. If i also has a key, it is i's key columns that are used to match to x's key columns (column 1 of i's key is joined to column 1 of x's key, column 2 of i's key to column 2 of x's key, and so on for as long as the shorter key) and a binary merge of the two tables is carried out. In all joins the names of the columns are irrelevant; the columns of x's key are joined to in order, either from column 1 onwards of i when i is unkeyed, or from column 1 onwards of i's key. In code, the number of join columns is determined by min(length(key(x)),if (haskey(i)) length(key(i)) else ncol(i)).

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This is the confusing part for me: "If i also has a key, it is i's key columns that are used to match to x's key columns (column 1 of i's key is joined to column 1 of x's key, column 2 to column 2, and so on)..." It makes it sound like we will use all the keys in i and match to columns in x even if we run out of columns in x that are part of the key. Thanks for clarifying! –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 19:44
    
But if we run out key columns in x, then what else could we do but stop there? Why does it make it sound like we will use all of i's key columns? –  Matt Dowle Oct 16 '12 at 19:50
    
It sounds like scrolling through the columns of i that are the keys and then match to the 1st 2nd.. Nth column of x, even if only the first K<N are keyed. Maybe I just read into it a bit more than I should have. –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 19:51
    
I can see that adding something like "when x and i are both keyed, there will be min(length(key(i)),length(key(x))) join columns; i.e., columns involved in the join". Would that help? –  Matt Dowle Oct 16 '12 at 19:52
5  
Changes committed and NEWS item added. –  Matt Dowle Oct 16 '12 at 20:32

Quote data.table FAQ:

X[Y] is a join, looking up X's rows using Y (or Y's key if it has one) as an index. Y[X] is a join, looking up Y's rows using X (or X's key if it has one) as an index. merge(X,Y) does both ways at the same time. The number of rows of X[Y] and Y[X] usually differ; whereas the number of rows returned by merge(X,Y) and merge(Y,X) is the same.

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1  
apologies if the question was unclear but this is not related to what I was attempting to figure out. –  Alex Oct 16 '12 at 19:45

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