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I'm trying to learn the basics of JavaScript I cant figure out why this doesn't work...it's so basic?

<html>
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8" />
<style type="text/css">
    ul{
        list-style-type:none;
    }
    div{
        width:300px;
        height:200px;
        background-color:#0066cc;
    }
</style>

<script language="text/javascript"> 
    var testing = document.getElementById("addBtn");
    testing.addEventListener("click", function(e){ alert("test") } , false);
</script>

</head>
<body>
<ul id="placeholder"></ul>
<a href="#" id="addBtn">Add</a>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
This is so much easier if you skip basic Javascript and learn jQuery instead. –  Paul Tomblin Oct 16 '12 at 18:27
2  
@PaulTomblin Probably. But that's also horrible advice is you want to have any idea what you are really doing. slideshare.net/rmurphey/the-jquery-divide-5287573 –  Alex Wayne Oct 16 '12 at 18:29
    
@PaulTomblin "I'm trying to learn the basics of JavaScript" so I don't think so... –  Ian Oct 16 '12 at 18:29
    
@AlexWayne, I'm not seeing anything in that slideshow that says why you shouldn't learn jQuery, only that shitty programmers write shitty code no matter what tool they use. –  Paul Tomblin Oct 16 '12 at 18:36
    
@PaulTomblin The moral of that presentation is learn JavaScript, and then learn jQuery as one of the many tools in your toolbox. Instead of just learning jQuery. jQuery should be treated as a javascript library, not an entire language. You wouldn't learn Struts without Java, Rails without Ruby, UIKit without ObjectiveC. And you shouldn't learn jQuery without JavaScript. –  Alex Wayne Oct 16 '12 at 18:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The addBtn is not loaded when you attempt to access it. You should perform that action once the DOM has loaded, either by moving that code to the bottom of the file, or through the onload event:

window.onload = function() {
    var testing = document.getElementById("addBtn");
    testing.addEventListener("click", function(e){ alert("test") } , false);
}
share|improve this answer

When the code:

var testing = document.getElementById("addBtn");

gets run, the addBtn element has not yet been parsed. One thing you could do would be to move the <script> tag down to the bottom of the page.

Another thing you could do is run the code within the onload event. Something like:

<script language="text/javascript">
   window.onload = function () {
      var testing = document.getElementById("addBtn");
       testing.addEventListener("click", function(e){ alert("test") } , false);
   };
</script>
share|improve this answer

In addition to using window.onload (which is the key answer to your question), consider using <script> or <script type="text/javascript">, as the "language" attribute is deprecated. More info here.

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