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I'm trying to write image processing OpenCL application, but my problem that any attempt to alter input image produces artifacts which look like vertical bars. This does not happen if I copy image pixels without altering them. So for example this line produces artifacts:

pixel = (uint4)(image1_pixel.x,
                image1_pixel.y,
                image1_pixel.z,
                255);

...but this one works as expected:

pixel = (uint4)(image1_pixel.x,
                image1_pixel.y,
                image1_pixel.z,
                image1_pixel.w);

Input is opaque 32-bit PNG image, so I expect both code lines to produce the same result. In reality, however, only second line works as expected. First line gives output with artifacts.

Here is my kernel:

__constant sampler_t sampler = CLK_NORMALIZED_COORDS_FALSE |
                              CLK_ADDRESS_CLAMP |
                              CLK_FILTER_NEAREST;

__kernel void test(__read_only image2d_t image1,
                  __write_only image2d_t out) {
  const int2 pos = (int2)(get_global_id(0), get_global_id(1) );
  uint4 image1_pixel = read_imageui(image1, sampler, pos);
  uint4 pixel = (uint4)(image1_pixel.x,
                        image1_pixel.y,
                        image1_pixel.z,
                        255);
  write_imageui(out, pos, pixel);
}

Here is relevant portion of main.cpp code:

  CImg<unsigned char> image1("../input.png");
  ...
  Image2D clImage1 = Image2D(context,
    CL_MEM_READ_ONLY | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR,
    ImageFormat(CL_RGBA, CL_UNSIGNED_INT8),
    image1.width(), image1.height(), 0, image1.data() );
  Image2D clResult = Image2D(context, CL_MEM_WRITE_ONLY,
    ImageFormat(CL_RGBA, CL_UNSIGNED_INT8),
    image1.width(), image1.height(), 0, NULL);
  Kernel test = Kernel(program, "test");
  test.setArg(0, clImage1); test.setArg(1, clResult);
  Event kernel_event, read_event;
  queue.enqueueNDRangeKernel(test, NullRange,
    NDRange(image1.width(), image1.height() ),
    NullRange, NULL, &kernel_event);
  cl::size_t<3> origin;
  origin.push_back(0); origin.push_back(0); origin.push_back(0);
  cl::size_t<3> region;
  region.push_back(image1.width() );
  region.push_back(image1.height() ); region.push_back(1);
  queue.enqueueReadImage(clResult, CL_TRUE,
                         origin, region, 0, 0,
                         image1.data(), NULL, NULL);
  kernel_event.wait();
  image1.save("../output.png");

Here can be downloaded full source code for my test application (it contains short main.cpp under 30 lines, CMakeLists.txt, readme.txt explaining how to compile and run it, input image and the kernel). I use CImg library to load and save images. I double-checked that input opens as 32-bit RGBA image. I tried to run the kernel with AMD or NVidia SDK and got the same result.

Any idea why I get unexpected result?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

CImg uses planar format, and OpenCL's image2d_t expects interleaved (e.g. planar is: R1R2R3R4R5R6...G1G2G3G4G5G6...B1B2B3B4B5B6..., and interleaved is: R1G1B1R2G2B2R3G3B3...) When you copy the pixels, without altering them, the planar format is not lost and it works, but if you start modifying one component of the image you will be actually modifying all the components of a pixel and thus the blackness, because of this planar/interleaved problem.

If you want to stick with CImg, you can multiplex the image before sending it to the device:

CImg<unsigned int> muxRGBA(const CImg<unsigned int>& pic)
{
    assert( pic.spectrum() == 3 );
    CImg<float> mux(pic.width()*4,pic.height(),pic.depth(),1);

    cimg_forXYZ(pic,x,y,z){    
        for(int k=0; k<3; k++) {
            mux(x*4+k,y,z,0) = pic(x,y,z,k);
        }
        mux(x*4+3,y,z,0) = 1.0f; // alpha channel
    }
    return mux;
}

and then demultiplex it after the processing, so you can still display/save it with CImg:

CImg<unsigned int> demuxRGBA(const CImg<unsigned int>& pic)
{
    assert( pic.spectrum()==1 );
    assert( pic.width()%4 == 0 );
    CImg<float> demux(pic.width()/4,pic.height(),pic.depth(),3);

    cimg_forXYZ(demux,x,y,z) {
        for(int k=0; k<3; k++) {
            demux(x,y,z,k) = pic(x*4+k,y,z,0);
        }
    }
    return demux;
}
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The kernel is correct, but CImg seems to be doing something very wrong, so it is bad idea to use it in this case. Instead, I have used Magick++. It isn't as simple as CImg but it is more reliable and it works.

This is how I read the image from the file and convert it to RGBA format so I can use it with cl::Image2D:

Magick::Image image1;
image1.read("input1/0.png");
long image1_size = 4 * image1.rows() * image1.columns();
uint8_t *image1_pixels = new uint8_t[image1_size];
image1.write(0, 0, image1.columns(), image1.rows(),
             "RGBA", CharPixel, image1_pixels);
...
Image2D clImage1 = Image2D(context,
  CL_MEM_READ_ONLY | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR,
  ImageFormat(CL_RGBA, CL_UNSIGNED_INT8),
  image1.columns(), image1.rows(), 0, image1_pixels);

And this is how I write the result to the file:

queue.enqueueReadImage(clResult, CL_TRUE,
                       origin, region, 0, 0,
                       image1_pixels, NULL, NULL);
image1.read(image1.columns(), image1.rows(),
            "RGBA", CharPixel, image1_pixels);
image1.write("../output.png");

Here can be downloaded full source code.

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