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Some websites that broadcast live video will use an HTTP live stream. By default the Content-Length header will be set at 2147483647.

With wget you can ignore this value with a command line switch

--ignore-length         ignore `Content-Length' header field.

Can Firefox download a file while ignoring the Content-Length header?

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I think it would help to have a little bit context for your question. It seems to me instead of setting Content-Length to semi-arbitrary number, the HTTP server should really use chunked encoding (if you can assume HTTP/1.1). The described behavior seems broken to me. –  FooF Dec 28 '12 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I think this is what you're looking for: wget for firefox

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I think the web server behavior is incorrect. If the content length is unknown, the HTTP server should use chunked encoding. Having said that, it is easy to test how browser deals with standard incompliant HTTP server.

Test Set-up

Create dummy HTTP server with the described behavior (we use Python):

#!/usr/bin/python

import SocketServer
import time

class MyHttpHandler(SocketServer.BaseRequestHandler):
    def send_stuff(self, msg):
        print msg
        self.request.send(msg)

    def handle(self):
        print("REQUEST: <<<" + self.request.recv(4096) + ">>>")
        headers = """HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r
Content-Length: 2147483647\r
Content-Type: text/html\r
rn"""
        self.send_stuff(headers)
        self.send_stuff("<html><body>n")
        for count in range(1,10):
            self.send_stuff("Hello, firefox!<p>n")
            time.sleep(1)
        self.send_stuff("</body></html>n")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    HOST, PORT = "0.0.0.0", 8888
    server = SocketServer.TCPServer((HOST, PORT), MyHttpHandler)
    server.serve_forever()

(adapted from http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/socketserver.html).

Explanation

This is what the sample program does:

  1. Wait for incoming TCP connection
  2. read the request (self.request.recv(4096))
  3. write response headers (using Content-Length: 2147483647)
  4. write ten times Hello, Firefox!<p> sleeping 1 second between writes
  5. close the connection (by returning from the handle() method.

Illustration

Here's illustration how the response looks like:

$ curl -i 10.20.32.85:8888/
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Length: 2147483647
Content-Type: text/html

<html><body>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
Hello, firefox!<p>
</body></html>

(between Hello, firefox! lines there is a one second pause, taking 10 seconds to finish receiving the content).

Answer to the question

My Firefox is version 17.0.1, and (using e.g. URL http://localhost:8888/) with this example seems to wait for the TCP close. (In comparison, Chromium browser will not show anything.) The behavior seems different with larger content due to caching semantics and on-the-fly rendering implemented in the browser.

Test – Variation

I modified the handler()

    def handle(self):
        print("REQUEST: <<<" + self.request.recv(4096) + ">>>")
        headers = """HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r
Content-Length: 2147483647\r
Content-Type: text/html\r
\r\n"""
        self.send_stuff(headers)
        self.send_stuff("<html><body>\n")
        for i in range(1,11):
            for j in range(1,11):
                self.request.send("%d:%d: Hello, firefox!<p>\n" % (i, j))
                #self.send_stuff("Hello, firefox!<p>\n")
            print "i=%d" % i
            time.sleep(3)
        self.send_stuff("</body></html>\n")
        time.sleep(10)

to test the browser behavior with larger content. I see the content already with (i,j) = (6,10) before TCP close.

TL;DR

With small content body, Firefox (version 17.0.1) waits for TCP close before rendering anything, but if content body is larger it will start to render already before TCP connection closed. Note that this only tests HTML content, and with different content type behavior could very well be different.

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