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I am trying out a small JavaScript library, SnackJS and am doing pretty well. But I've hit a wall, and can't seem to figure this one out:

Snack:

<script type="text/javascript">
    snack.ready(function () {
        var parameters = {
            node: document.body,
            event: 'change',
            delegate: function (node) {
                return node.getElementsByClassName("qty")
            }
        }

        snack.listener(parameters, postToOtherPage);

        function postToOtherPage() {
            var options = {
                method: 'post',
                url: '/InlineEditing',
                data: {
                    qty: 5,
                    id: "hi"
                }
            }
        }
    });
</script>

My question is, on the change event of an input element, how do I post the id of the element, along with that element's value (qty) to another page?

I did look through the documentation, but I can't quite figure it out.

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know either from the documentation, but as it's a standard event listener you should get the event object as the first argument and the event target as the this object - try to console.log them. – Bergi Oct 16 '12 at 22:54
1  
Your question is about the event listener, not about snack.request, isn't it? – Bergi Oct 16 '12 at 22:57
    
Ah, I'm not sure to be honest. What I am trying to do is get the value of the quantity textbox that triggered the 'change' event and also get the #id of the textbox that triggered the 'change' event, so I can POST it ajax style to another page. Hope that makes more sense. – Arrow Oct 16 '12 at 22:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're missing a

snack.request(options, callback);

call. A part from that, your code looks fine.. what's wrong with it?

Update

oh, I see you're not retrieving the id from the element.. from the docs: the first argument to event callback is the node which fired the event, so:

snack.ready(function () {
    var parameters = {
        node: document.body,
        event: 'change',
        delegate: function (node) {
            return node.getElementsByClassName("qty")
        }
    }

    snack.listener(parameters, postToOtherPage);

    function postToOtherPage(event) {
        var options = {
            method: 'post',
            url: '/InlineEditing',
            data: {
                qty: 5,
                id: this.id
            }
        }
        snack.request(options, function(){
          // do something with response..
        });
    }
});

should work fine..

Update

Nope, sorry, further reading the docs I found out they're using callback.apply(this, [event]), as usual.. updated code above.

By the way, I don't see the point in using this kind of micro-libraries instead of well-established libraries such as jQuery/Zepto, since the pros of the micro-libaries in terms of size are not worth IMO the disadvantages.

Consider that "larger" libaries:

  • have a lot more features: what about the day you'll decide to extend your application functionality more?
  • have a larger community/commercial-based support: books, reference, guides, ...
  • are more likely to have already solved problems/issues that are still there in micro libraries. Just think of the hundreds of cross-browser compatibility hacks...

However, this one is just my opinion, just take it as my personal advice.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know how to get the actual values from the elements that triggered the change event to begin with using SnackJS. – Arrow Oct 16 '12 at 22:57
    
Oh my, that's easy! Lol. Thank you @redShadow! Btw, would I do something like node.innerText to get the value of the qty textbox? – Arrow Oct 16 '12 at 23:03
    
How the hell you figure that out from those Docs? Those docs seem to be lacking. Or maybe I'm just slow :/ – Arrow Oct 16 '12 at 23:05
    
Thank you so much. This has helped a lot! – Arrow Oct 16 '12 at 23:07
3  
I managed to figure that out thanks to knowledge of many others libraries "they must have done in a similar way.. oh, right, of course they did" :) Anyways, the not-so-clear doc is another reason for which I'd recommend you to use jQuery :) – redShadow Oct 16 '12 at 23:09

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