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Assume that we have several million long lines of text that must be parsed.
On my i7 2600 CPU it takes about 13 milliseconds to parse every 1000 lines.
Therefore, parsing 1,000,000 lines takes around 13 seconds.
To decrease execution time, I have managed using multiple threads.
Using a blocking queue, I push 1,000,000 lines as a set of 1000 chunk each containing 1000 lines and consume the chunks using 8 threads. The code is simple and seems to be working however, the performance is not encouraging and takes around 11 seconds.
Here is the main fraction of multi-threaded code:

    for(int i=0;i<threadCount;i++)
    {
        Runnable r=new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                try{
                    while (true){
                        InputType chunk=inputQ.poll(10, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
                        if(chunk==null){
                            if(inputRemains.get())
                                continue;
                            else
                                return;
                        }
                        processItem(chunk);
                    }
                }catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();  
                }
            }
        };
        Thread t=new Thread(r);
        threadList.add(t);
        for(Thread t: threads)
            t.join();

I have used ExecutorService too but the performance is worse!
Changing the chunk size does not help too and the perfomance does not improve.
It means that the blocking queue is not a bottleneck.
On the other hand, when I run 4 instances of the serial program concurrently, it just takes 15 seconds to all 4 instances finish. This means that I can process 4,000,0000 lines using 4 process in 15 seconds and hence, the speed up is around 3.4 that is very promising compared to 1.2 speed up of multi-threading.

I am wondering that anyone has any idea about this?
The problem is very straight forward: a set of lines in a blocking queue and several threads that pol items from the queue and process them in parallel. The queue is filled initially so the threads are fully busy.
I had similar experiences before too but I can not figure out why multi-processing is better.
I should also mention that I run the test on Windows 7 and using a 1.7 JRE.
Any idea is welcomed and thanks before hand.

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What is TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS used for? If this is a wait before next try, I'm guessing your threads are stepping on each other, and getting into a blocking state while they wait for new input. Try measuring the elapsed time each thread is waiting for input form the queue. –  aglassman Oct 16 '12 at 21:00
    
Have you tried your speed if you fill the queue with a producer that generates static data, not from a file? Also, if you reduce the "work" for each thread for parsing the data, so they just fetch from the queue, how does that impact performance? –  Roger Lindsjö Oct 16 '12 at 21:03
    
If it's a blocking queue, why are you polling it with a timeout? –  Martin James Oct 16 '12 at 21:03
2  
Something more to look at: Monitor your JVM garbage collection using jstat (or similar). Maybe your parsing generates so much objects that most time is spent in GC? –  Roger Lindsjö Oct 16 '12 at 21:18
1  
90% is interesting. That means that you are not CPU bound. This would rule out GC overhead as well. Are these threads writing out into a blocking queue? –  Gray Oct 16 '12 at 21:20
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4 Answers

Edit:

So I initially thought that your timing was around your entire program. If you are just timing the processing of the lines after they have been read into memory, then it may be that your processItem(chunk); method is either doing IO of its own or it is writing information into a synchronized object or other shared variable that is stopping it from being able to fulling run concurrently.


I am wondering that anyone has any idea about this?

Your problem may be that you are IO bound and not CPU board. The only way you will get a large speed improvement by adding more threads is if you are doing more CPU processing than you are doing reading from (or writing to) disk. Once you have maxed out the IO capabilities of your disk subsystem, there is not much that you can do to improve the speed of the processing. As you have demonstrated, adding more threads can actually slow down an IO bound program.

I'd add a single extra thread (i.e. 2 processing threads) to see if that helps. If all you are getting is a 2 second speed improvement then you are going to have to divide the file up over multiple drives or move it to a memory drive if this is a repeated task to be able to read it faster.

I have used ExecutorService too but the performance is worse!

This might happen because you are using too many threads or maybe processing too few lines per iteration/chunk.

On the other hand, when I run 4 instances of the serial program concurrently, it just takes 15 seconds to all 4 instances finish

I suspect this is because each of them can use each other's disk cache from the OS. When the first application reads block #1, the other 3 applications don't have to. Try copying the file 4 times and try 4 serial applications running at the same time each on their own file. You should see the difference.

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Parsing the lines is absolutely CPU-intensive and as I mentioned, before starting the actual computation I push all the lines to the queue. Hence, there is no disk IO involved. –  Saeed Shahrivari Oct 16 '12 at 21:06
    
And the 13 second timing of your application starts after the file is read in and the CPU processing starts @SaeedShahrivari? –  Gray Oct 16 '12 at 21:08
    
Yes. No IO time is included in timings. Actually I produce random lines and I do not read or write from file. –  Saeed Shahrivari Oct 16 '12 at 21:20
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I would blame your parallelisation of your code. If items are available to process then several threads will be competing for the same resource (the queue). Contention for synchronisation locks is a bit of a performance killer. If items are being processed faster than they are being added to the queue then the threads that are being starved are pretty much just busy loops eg. while (true) {}. This is because your poll time is very short and when the polling fails you simply immediately try again.

A little note on synchronisation. To begin with the JVM uses busy loops to wait for a resource to become available as (in general) code is written to release synchronisation locks as quickly as possible and the alternative (doing a context switch) is quite expensive. Eventually if the JVM finds it is spending most of its time waiting for synchronisation locks then it will default to do switching out to a different thread if it cannot acquire a lock.

A better solution is to have one thread reading in the data and dispatching a new thread whenever there is both an available slot for a thread and data for a new thread. Here Executor would be useful as it can keep track of which threads have finished and which are still busy. But the pseudo-code would look something like:

int charsRead;
char[] buffer = new char[BUF_SIZE];
int startIndex = 0;

while((charsRead = inputStreamReader.read(buffer, startIndex, buffer.length)
                != -1) {
    // find last new line so don't give a thread any partial lines
    int lastNewLine = findFirstNewLineBeforeIndex(buffer, charsRead);

    waitForAvailableThread(); // if not max threads running then should return 
    // immediately
    Thread t = new Thread(createRunnable(buffer, lastNewLine));
    t.start();
    addRunningThread(t);

    // copy any overshoot to the start of a new buffer
    // use a new buffer as the another thread is now reading from the previous 
    // buffer
    char[] newBuffer = new char[BUF_SIZE];
    System.arraycopy(buffer, lastNewLine+1, newBuffer, 0, 
        charsRead-lastNewLine-1);
    buffer = newBuffer;
}
waitForRemainingThreadsToTerminate();
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it takes about 13 milliseconds to parse every 1000 lines. Therefore, parsing 1,000,000 lines takes around 13 seconds.

The jVM doesn't warm up until it has done something 10,000 after which it can be 10-100x faster so it could be 13 second or it could be 130 ms or less.

Using a blocking queue, I push 1,000,000 lines as a set of 1000 chunk each containing 1000 lines and consume the chunks using 8 threads. The code is simple and seems to be working however, the performance is not encouraging and takes around 11 seconds.

I suggest you retest one thread, you are likely to find it takes less than 11 second.

The bottle neck is the time it takes to parse the String into a line and create the String object, the rest is just overhead which doesn't address the true bottle neck.


If you read different files, one per cpus, you can get close to linear speed up. The problem with reading lines is you have to read one after the other and you get little benefit from concurrency.

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2600 is using HT ( Hyper threading) for 8 threads .. and parsing is mainly memory work so little benefit from HT..

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