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how to write program that takes a number as its argument and return the sum of 1+2+.. up to argument?

I can't get the codes right. Can somebody help me?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>                                                               
int main(int argc, char*argv[])
{
int i;
int sum =0;

if(argc !=2){
 printf("usage: %s <count> \n", argv[0]);
 exit(n);
 }

for(i=1; i<=atoi(argv[1]); i++){
 sum+=i;
}
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closed as too localized by ouah, Jesse Beder, Peter O., Lucifer, AAA Oct 17 '12 at 1:31

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3  
what's the error? you're missing a trailing '}' at the end of the program. –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 21:18
4  
@PrototypeStark, Not to mention something that prints the sum. –  chris Oct 16 '12 at 21:18
4  
use the formula Sum = n * ( n + 1) / 2 instead for efficiency. –  SparKot ॐ Oct 16 '12 at 21:18
2  
@SparKot I suspect the point is rather to get familiar with loops than efficiency. Otherwise, I agree. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 16 '12 at 21:19
1  
@Cthulhu, meta.stackexchange.com/questions/147100/… –  chris Oct 16 '12 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

First, to answer your question.

You need to actually output the result. Something like:

printf("%d\n", sum);

Or return it to whoever called the program, although that is a little unusual:

int main( int argc, char **argv ) {
    ...
    return sum;
}

But I am providing my own answer here because there is a good reason to consider doing this in a loop... At least until you've thought about it a bit more.

Namely, the formula (n * (n+1)) / 2 will overflow 32-bit integers and produce the wrong answer when n becomes 65536 or greater. But the 32-bit integer can itself store a sum up to n <= 92681. That means the formula by itself produces the wrong answer for roughly 30% of the solution space.

So you might think you need to loop, but there's a little trick here. Because the formula uses both n and n+1, you can guarantee that one of those numbers is evenly divisible by 2. And therefore you can do it like this:

unsigned long n;
unsigned long sum;

n = atoi(argv[1]);

if( n == 0 || n > 92681 ) {
    printf( "The supplied value (%u) is out of range\n", n );
} else {
    if( (n % 2) == 0 ) {
        sum = (n / 2) * (n+1);
    } else {
        sum = n * ((n+1) / 2);
    }
    printf( "Sum from 1 to %u is %u\n", n, sum );
}

Now you have a simple formula that produces the same answer as the loop, at least for all values of n that don't lead to overflowing the sum.

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1  
For fiddly reasons, it turns out that another equivalent formula is (n | 1) * ((n + 1) / 2), which avoids overflow, branching and readability. Personally I don't think that's worth the comment I'd have to write to explain it, but there it is :-) –  Steve Jessop Oct 16 '12 at 23:24
    
Ahhhh that's real clever. Nice one, cheers! =) –  paddy Oct 16 '12 at 23:29
1  
Note that your limits are for unsigned 32-bit integers, for signed integers, the numbers would be 46341 and 65535. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 16 '12 at 23:30
    
Correct. I didn't see any reason to consider signed integers when I was talking about maximimizing the valid solution space. But you have a point: I should have explicitly mentioned it, because the question was using signed (well, if their compiler defaulted to signed) –  paddy Oct 16 '12 at 23:33
1  
For int, there is no default, that is signed per the standard, only char leaves the choice to the implementation. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 16 '12 at 23:59
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>                                                               
int main(int argc, char*argv[])
{
    int i;
    int sum =0;

    if(argc !=2){
        printf("usage: %s <count> \n", argv[0]);
        exit(n);
    }
    int n = atoi(argv[1]);
    sum = (n*(n+1))/2; // formula of sum of first n numbers
}
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1  
I don't think the formula change really constitutes an answer. –  chris Oct 16 '12 at 21:27

No need to use a loop. You can use the simple formula,

int sum = (n * (n + 1)) / 2

Where n will be your input.

output will be the summation of each digit starting from your input to 1 decreasing by 1 - same as your loop.

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