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So I have a simple singleton template base class (minified for question purposes):

template <typename T>
class Singleton {
public:
    static T& instance() {
        static T me;
        return me;
    }
};

Now I want to have a "Base class that's a singleton":

class Base : public Singleton<Base> {
public:
    void print() { std::cout << &instance() << std::endl; }
}

What I want now is deriving children classes from this base class, which are their own singletons:

class A : public Base {
    // ...
}

class B : public Base {
    // ...
}

Of course if I do this

A::instance().print();
B::instance().print();

I get the same address in both cases. Is there a way to accomplish this?

In case you're wondering what for: I want to program a ResourceManager base class which is being inherited by a class ImageManager, a class 'AudioManager', etc. And I'd like them not to share actually the same instance, but still having only one instance per manager...

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I don't understand. Why the classes at all? template <typename T> T& instance() { ... }. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 16 '12 at 21:18
1  
you're not the first person to make a templated singleton class but I hope you're the last (I'm sure you won't be). Take 2 steps back and design it away. –  Dave Oct 16 '12 at 21:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will have to make Base a template and pass that to Singleton, then inherit from Base<A> if you wish to achieve this. Or, if you want Base to be a Singleton and A/B to be a Singleton, then they will have to inherit from Singleton<A>, Singleton<B> in addition to Base.

But dear lord, man, Singletons are a curse on you and your children for a hundred generations. Why would you do that to yourself?

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My suggestion would be to make Base a non singleton class and then make Class A and Class B singletons that instantiate the Base class. This gives you flexibility and follows the object oriented principle of favoring composition over inheritance http://www.artima.com/lejava/articles/designprinciples4.html

Because of the static members required on a Singleton you cannot directly inherit from a Singleton Class. Composition will serve you better in this situation, and most others as well.

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I've accepted the other answer, because it is the answer to the question, but I think I'm gonna go with your approach... The only thing I don't really get is how to 'reuse' methods of the Base class. I would need to wrap the calls in child class methods, wouldn't I? –  Vapire Oct 16 '12 at 21:46
    
To reuse them you'd refactor the base methods so that you won't need to subclass the Base class at all. In Class A you'd have an instance of BaseClass, the same in Class B. You could also add make BaseClass a singleton if you really needed only one to exist, but I'd stay away from that if you can avoid it. –  earl3s Oct 16 '12 at 22:42
    
Yes. So for instance if I want to call A::print() I'd have to implement this static method to call me->baseObject->print(), right? –  Vapire Oct 16 '12 at 22:45
1  
Exactly. A call to A::print could pass unique information to the baseObject->print method. A::print() would call me->baseObject->print(instance). –  earl3s Oct 16 '12 at 22:53

The best solution that I see for when a base class must have something from its child is using Child as an argument to Base as follow:

template< bool val, class TrueT, class FlaseT >
struct If {
    typedef TrueT type;
};
template< class TrueT, class FalseT >
struct If< false, TrueT, FalseT > {
    typedef FalseT type;
};
template< class DerivedT = void >
class Base {
public:
    typedef typename If<std::is_same<DerivedT, void>::value,
        Base<DerivedT>, DerivedT>::type this_type;
    static this_type& instance() {
        this_type me;
        return me;
    }

public:
    void test() {}
};
class A : public Base<A> {
public:
    void print() {}
};
class B : public Base<B> {
public:
    void print() {}
};
Base<>::instance().test();
B::instance().print();
A::instance().print();
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