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I'm trying to write a program where the user inputs a two-digit integer and the output is the second digit printed the amount of times indicated by the first digit. Here is what I have so far:

number = input('Type two-digit integer \n')
a = int(number)//10
b = int(number)%10
if len(number) != 2:
    print(number, 'is not a two-digit integer')
else:
    print(a*str(b))

When I test this out it does what I intend it to do as long as someone types in numbers. If someone were to type in, say, 6r, an error message would pop up saying:

a = int(number)//10

ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '6r'

So I would assume that something would need to be put in the second line of the code to test if the input is actually an integer, how would I do that? Would I be better off rewriting it in a different way? Please keep in mind that I'm taking an intro course to Python and this is a question on a practice midterm I am taking, so in the case that I would have to answer something like this on the real midterm I can't use a lot of complicated processes.

This is something I tried that works if someone types something that isn't an integer, but for some reason that I don't know it gives the same message for non-integers to integers and doesn't function as I intend it to:

number = input('Type two-digit integer \n')
if (isinstance(number, int)) == False:
    print(number, 'is not a two-digit integer')
elif len(number) != 2:
    print(number, 'is not a two-digit integer')
else:
    a = int(number)//10
    b = int(number)%10
    print(a*str(b))

Help would be greatly appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

The best option here is to catch the exception. Something has gone wrong, and that's exactly what exceptions are designed to handle:

try:
    ...
except ValueError:
    print("You need to enter an integer!")
    ...

Python has the mantra of it's better to ask for forgiveness than permission, so don't check if it works beforehand, try it, then handle the problem if it doesn't work.

This makes for more reliable code (the check might accidentally disallow good input, or let through bad input), and makes code read better (you deal with the normal case first, then handle problems, rather than having to check for problems, then process).

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My personal preference is to use a try-except when you usually wouldn't expect an invalid input, and use if-elif-else when you expect an invalid input most of the time. Since you are expecting the user to put an int in, the try-except would be the best construct to use. This is definitely the best answer! –  Thane Brimhall Oct 16 '12 at 21:28
1  
@ThaneBrimhall That's a good way to do it from a performance and code clarity viewpoint, although I'd not there are some cases where catching the exception should be done every time, such as wherever you deal with file systems (as there is the possibility of race conditions). –  Lattyware Oct 16 '12 at 21:30
1  
That's a good point. There's definitely exceptions to my rule. try: my_rule(); except: do_something_else(). –  Thane Brimhall Oct 16 '12 at 21:31
1  
Ah, exception humour, I always raise the topic with my friends, but they never seem to catch on. –  Lattyware Oct 16 '12 at 21:34
1  
@Lattyware try as you might, did you finally give up? –  Jon Clements Oct 16 '12 at 21:41

This is a perfect time for try and except:

try:
   val = int(number)
except ValueError:
   print("That's not a number...")
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Maybe the simplest thing would be to do number.isdigit(). isdigit will return true if all the characters in the string are digits, which would mean it's a positive integer. So you could do something like:

if not number.isdigit():
    print "You didn't enter an integer!"

Note that using try/except as other answers suggest will allow negative integers, which probably don't make sense for your use case (you can't print a string -2 times).

The thing is that you don't really want "a two-digit integer", you want a string consisting of two digits, which you are going to use as two separate numbers.

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But it's no good for negative integers ... (which might be beyond the scope of this question, but it's still good to know). –  mgilson Oct 16 '12 at 21:23
    
@mgilson: Yes, but that's an advantage, because his actual use case is also not going to work with negative integers. –  BrenBarn Oct 16 '12 at 21:23
    
You suggest that catching the exception is bad as it might let through bad input, but I would argue that it is better to explicitly check for that case after (if x < 0: ...). –  Lattyware Oct 16 '12 at 21:26

I'd go for something like:

number = re.match(r'(\d)(\d)', input('Typo two digit number:\n'))
if number is not None:
    print(int(number.group(1)) * number.group(2))
else:
    pass # something wasn't right...
share|improve this answer
    
Really? A regular expression for this? Massive overkill. This is way more complex and way less clear. –  Lattyware Oct 16 '12 at 21:35
    
@Lattyware a regex isn't my first thought for most things, but: 3 lines - automatic character and length validation, automatic variable splitting and not at all unclear (IMHO anyway) –  Jon Clements Oct 16 '12 at 21:42

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