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I find myself typing

double foo=1.0/sqrt(...);

a lot, and I've heard that modern processors have built-in inverse square root opcodes.

Is there a C or C++ standard library inverse square root function that

  1. uses double precision floating point?
  2. is as accurate as 1.0/sqrt(...)?
  3. is just as fast or faster than the result of 1.0/sqrt(...)?
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@Pherric Oxide: That was inverse square, not inverse square root. –  Dan Oct 16 '12 at 21:28
    
Oops. Nevermind. –  PherricOxide Oct 16 '12 at 21:29
    
#define INSQRT(x) (1.0/sqrt(x)) –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 21:29
3  
The built-in inverse square root instruction that you've heard of is an approximation, not as exact as sqrt. See tommesani.com/SSEReciprocal.html –  Mark Ransom Oct 16 '12 at 21:47
2  
Not as fast as in Quake III Arena perhaps. –  Roman R. Oct 16 '12 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. No, there isn't. Not in C++. Nope.

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If your not afraid of using your own functions, try the following:

template <typename T>
T invsqrt(T x)
{
    return 1.0 / std::sqrt(x);
}

It should be just as fast as the orginal 1.0 / std::sqrt(x) in any modernly optimized compiler. Also, it can be used with doubles or floats.

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violates rule#3 in the question! –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 21:53
2  
Sorry, as I understand, it should be "just as fast". –  Ryan Oct 16 '12 at 21:54
    
Read stackoverflow.com/questions/2442358/… to see why or why not template functions should be slower than non-templated code. –  Ryan Oct 16 '12 at 21:57

If you find yourself writing the same thing over and over, you should think to yourself "function!":

double invsqrt(const double x)
{
    return 1.0 / std::sqrt(x);
}

Now the code is more self-documenting: people don't have to deduce 1.0 / std::sqrt(x) is the inverse square root, they read it. Additionally, you now get to plug in whatever implementation you want and each call-site automatically uses the updated definition.

To answer your question, no, there is no C(++) function for it, but now that you've made one if you find your performance is too lacking you can substitute your own definition.

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1  
@PrototypeStark: Because it's not as simple as either-or. One is type-checked, debugabble, scopable, overloadable, evaluates its argument is an expression once, etc. (all the features of a function), the other is not. And it's a single downvote, it's not the end of the world; I understand it's frustrating not getting a reason from the person themselves, but that's how it is. –  GManNickG Oct 16 '12 at 22:03
1  
I would argue that it is easier to read 1.0/sqrt(x) as the inverse square root than invsqrt(x), the former using the less ambiguous mathematical notation as opposed to an abbreviation. –  Dan Oct 17 '12 at 1:10
1  
"inverse square root" just means the reciprocal of the square root, though. It's not a detail, it's literally what the function name means. –  Dan Oct 17 '12 at 1:28
1  
@Dan: You're conflating implementation with specification. You're right, inverse square root is the reciprocal of the square root, but how to do get from that to 1.0 / sqrt(x)? It's not hard, of course, but that's not the point: it's still a division from specification to implementation. Hide the implementation, keep the specification; it makes reasoning and maintaining about your program easier. Consider how easy it would be to optimize every single inverse square root calculation in your entire program, just by changing the implementation and keeping the specification. –  GManNickG Oct 17 '12 at 1:37
2  
@GManNickG: While I'd usually be the first to agree with that logic, there are limits. You wouldn't write a function multiplyByTwo -- you'd write *2. Personally I'd say the inverse square root example is right on the borderline. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 17 '12 at 5:55

why not try this? #define INSQRT(x) (1.0/sqrt(x))

Its just as fast, requires less typing(makes you feel like its a function), uses double precision, as accurate as 1/sqrt(..)

share|improve this answer
1  
why the down-vote? –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 21:34
3  
I didn't downvote, but here's no use for a macro here when a function will do. (You even said it yourself: make it feel like a function? Just actually make a function.) –  GManNickG Oct 16 '12 at 21:43
    
@GManNickG The reason I didn't convert it to a function is, because the question clearly mentions: "is just as fast or faster than the result of 1.0/sqrt(...)". Making it a function will add additional overhead making the "statement" 1.0/sqrt(...) SLOWER. –  Aniket Oct 16 '12 at 21:48
5  
Not on any compiler from the last decade. –  GManNickG Oct 16 '12 at 21:54
1  
@PrototypeStark: Please provide benchmarks to back up your claim that using a real function will be slower. Macros may safely be avoided in the absence of evidence that they are required to meet some criterion. That said, I always carry my #define isNaN(x) ((x)!=(x)) around with me; sometimes it just feels good to be so bad. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 17 '12 at 5:56

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