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I will explain my issue using an example:

A=[[1,2,10],[1,2,10],[3,4,5]]
B=[[1,2,30],[6,7,9]]

From these lists of lists, i would like to create a third one:

C=A+B

So i get :

C= [[1, 2, 10], [1, 2, 10], [3, 4, 5], [1, 2, 30], [6, 7, 9]]

Notice that there are three lists inside C , the [1, 2, 10], [1, 2, 10], [1, 2, 30] lists, which if described in terms of [x,y,z], they have the same x,y but different z.

So i would like to have this new list:

Averaged= [(1, 2, 16.666), (6, 7, 9), (3, 4, 5)]

where we find only one occurrence of the same x,y from lists

[1, 2, 30], [1, 2, 40], [1, 2, 50]

and the average of the corresponding z values (10+10+30)/3=16.666

I tried using for loops at the beginning but ended up trying to do this using defaultdict.

I ended up with this that keeps once the (x,y) but adds and not averages the corresponding z values:

from collections import defaultdict
Averaged=[]

A=[[1,2,10],[1,2,10],[3,4,5]]
B=[[1,2,30],[6,7,9]]
C=A+B
print "C=",C

ToBeAveraged= defaultdict(int)
for (x,y,z) in C:
    ToBeAveraged[(x,y)] += z
Averaged = [k + (v,) for k, v in ToBeAveraged.iteritems()]    

print 'Averaged=',Averaged

Is it possible to do this with defaultdict? Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
What if x and z are the same but y is different? –  Tyler Crompton Oct 16 '12 at 21:28
    
No, only (x,y) must be the same. To put more context to this let's say that (x,y) are coordinates and z is temperature. –  CosmoSurreal Oct 16 '12 at 21:31
1  
Not sure how exactly, but what about matching items in a list, and if the x,y are equal, appending that element to a new list, of which you will then average the third position –  chimpsarehungry Oct 16 '12 at 21:47
1  
I tried that but i am working with big lists and wanted to avoid creating more of them :) –  CosmoSurreal Oct 16 '12 at 21:50
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll need to sort the data first:

>>> C = sorted(A + B)
>>> def avg(x):
        return sum(x) / len(x)

>>> [[avg(i) for i in zip(*y)] for x,y in 
     itertools.groupby(C, operator.itemgetter(0,1))]
[[1.0, 2.0, 16.666666666666668], [3.0, 4.0, 5.0], [6.0, 7.0, 9.0]]

If you just want the groups before the average:

[list(y) for x,y in itertools.groupby(C, operator.itemgetter(0,1))]
share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting [[1, 2, 16], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 9]]. Any idea why i get integers? I'm using Python 2.7.3. Ok if all are integers it returns integers. It's ok. –  CosmoSurreal Oct 16 '12 at 21:47
    
@CosmoSurreal For python 2.x you need to converto to float. like float(len(x)) –  JBernardo Oct 16 '12 at 23:28
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In your code you are not dividing by the number of observations. I changed your code around to collect all observations of a given pair (x, y), and then take an average of them. There should be a more efficient solution, but this should work.

from collections import defaultdict
Averaged=[]

A=[[1,2,10],[1,2,10],[3,4,5]]
B=[[1,2,30],[6,7,9]]
C=A+B
print "C=",C

def get_mean(x):
    return sum(ele for ele in x) / float(len(x))

ToBeAveraged= defaultdict(list)
for (x,y,z) in C:
    ToBeAveraged[(x,y)].append(z)
Averaged = [k + (get_mean(v),) for k, v in ToBeAveraged.iteritems()]    

print 'Averaged=',Averaged

Result:

C= [[1, 2, 10], [1, 2, 10], [3, 4, 5], [1, 2, 30], [6, 7, 9]]
Averaged= [(1, 2, 16.666666666666668), (6, 7, 9.0), (3, 4, 5.0)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this. I am not yet used to what defaultdict can achieve and this is quite an eye opener. –  CosmoSurreal Oct 16 '12 at 21:58
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