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Hi I was trying to save some typing and be "clever" by doing this...

class foo(object):
    def __init__()
        self.eric = 0
        self.john = 0
        self.michael = 0
        self.switchdict = {'Eric':self.eric, 'John':self.john, 'Michael':self.michael}

    def update(self, whattoupdate, value):
       if whattoupdate in self.switchdict:
           self.switchdict[whattoupdate] += value

After it didn't work it was obvious that the integer values were not getting passed by reference, but just as integers. I resorted to a long work-around by turning the attributes into lists but I suspect there is a better way.

I actually have about 30 of these attributes, so saving the typing and being able to add them to a list is pretty handy but my google-fu did not yield any satisfying ways to do this.

Any clever but still readable and Pythonic suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Any reason you can't just have a dict of name:count and access that via name - why do instance attributes need to exist? –  Jon Clements Oct 16 '12 at 23:37
    
integers are passed in exactly the same way as everything else. The difference is that integers are immutable: i = j = 1; assert i is j; i += 1; assert i is not j and i != j –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 16 '12 at 23:55
    
Hey Jon - that works too, I got into this solutions by coding without paying enough attention to design :-). I do like having the attributes as they are clearer to read (to me) than the dict contents. I settled on reimplementing using setattr(). –  tom stratton Oct 17 '12 at 0:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Congratulations! You just reinvented a limited form of setattr(). :-)

I think you're in for a maintenance nightmare if you go far down this road, but if you insist, I'd consider something like:

class foo(object):
    allowedattrs = ['eric', 'john', 'michael']

    def __init__(self):
        self.eric = 0
        self.john = 0
        self.michael = 0
        self.switchdict = {'Eric':self.eric, 'John':self.john, 'Michael':self.michael}

    def update(self, whattoupdate, value):
        key = whattoupdate.lower()
        if key not in self.allowedattrs:
            raise AttributeError(whattoupdate)
        setattr(self, key, getattr(self, key) + value)

f = foo()
f.update('john', 5)
f.update('john', 4)
print f.john

But wouldn't it really be a lot easier to store your values in a nice defaultdict?

from collections import defaultdict

class foo(object):
    allowedattrs = ['eric', 'john', 'michael']

    def __init__(self):
        self.values = defaultdict(int)

    def update(self, whattoupdate, value):
        self.values[whattoupdate] += value

f = foo()
f.update('john', 5)
f.update('john', 4)
print f.values['john']
share|improve this answer
    
I knew there was an elegant solution but what I am not seeing here is how the allowedattrs is used... I think that the idea to use setattr() is probably a more attractive way to go. If you want to provide some guidance in that direction I'd be very appreciative :=) –  tom stratton Oct 17 '12 at 0:14
    
Never mind - figured it out myself! –  tom stratton Oct 17 '12 at 0:23

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