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I used a Backgroudworker to do some work in order to do some time consuming tasks.

public void ConnectDataProvider()
    {
        bgw = new BackgroundWorker();
        bgw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bgw_DoWork);
        bgw.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(bgw_RunWorkerCompleted);

    }

Another method starts the background worker:

public void StartPolling()
    {
        bgw.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

Then I did the event handling:

void bgw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        // do it over again
        StartPolling();
    }    

void bgw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        // do work
        WriteData();
    }

As you can see, I started the worker over on completion. Now this works for a single backgroundworker.

Now I want a collection, and each item should perform this task. However with the concept above it will just keep on running in the first worker started, as it starts the worker over. I'm thinking, maybe a Timer in combination could solve the situation to give the other worker threads way.

Is the BackgroundWorker still a good choice? Is it common to reuse the BackgroundWorker like I did?

EDIT 1: To clairify: The problem I'm facing is, that I need manage the collection each with their own BackgroundWorker. I was thinking about a timer, to set off request periodically from each item. This is where I'm stuck.

EDIT 2: See my own answer, I didn't solve this issue, but found that I can go along with timers to get what I wanted.

EDIT 3: To clarify (another try, I'm not good at that) what I wanted to achieve: I've got tracking objects, for gps tracking. I want to track a whole bunch of them, so one object per tracking device. They all need to be polled frequently. Ihad a BackgroundWorker set up for a single test object. I liked they way the Backgroundworker would tell me when it's done. But I couldn't get it working with all of the tracking objects.

Now every tracking object has its own timer. This timer spawns a new thread and does the time consuming work (which I named DoWrite). No BackgroundWorker needed, as I dispose the timer and then create a new timer. That's all it does.

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Maybe you should explain the relation you see between a collection and a timer. I can't make it up from the question. –  Henk Holterman Aug 18 '09 at 16:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How many of these might there be? You should be careful of creating a 1:1 relationship between items in a collection and threads. Another coder might come along and expand this collection more than you planned.

For things like this I usually like to use just the one thread, and a queue - so the events just put the work that needs to be done in a ConcurrentQueue, and the thread starts if not running, and churns through the queued work until it's out of things to do, and dies. The next time more work comes in the event will check if the thread is running and start it.

It's cheaper because if there's a lot going on, you run just the one thread instead of stopping and starting a lot of them, or if there's very little going on, the one thread is almost never running.

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This one makes sense to me. Thank You. –  rdoubleui Oct 1 '09 at 11:38

Your solution would look more logical if you just put a while() loop in Dowork(), maybe with a little Sleep().

And then there would be no objection against running multiple Bgw's, although you may not see a great speed benefit.

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That doesn't work well, it leaves out the majority of the objects. I need to somehow force a periodically request from every item of the collection. –  rdoubleui Aug 18 '09 at 9:53
1  
Why would using a Bgw/item leave out anything? –  Henk Holterman Aug 18 '09 at 16:41

You can do exactly what you describe--just make sure that you pass the reference to the relevant background worker to StartPolling, thusly:

void bgw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    // do it over again
    StartPolling((BackgroundWorker)sender);
}

public void StartPolling(BackgroundWorker worker)
{
    worker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Then obviously, you need to manage the collection of BackgroundWorker's accordingly.

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my approach was rather to give every item their own backgroundworker object. That management of the collection of the bg workers is exactly what I'm looking for. –  rdoubleui Aug 18 '09 at 9:49

Why don't you use the progresschanged event? You could use the userstate object for passing data.

In do work just pool the devices, and in process changed send the data to the UI thread.

Do it in a endless while and use cancel to stop that thread.

Regards.

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That's how I'd do it. –  Allon Guralnek Sep 27 '09 at 18:40

When you have multiple time consuming tasks to be executed in the same time, I suggest you to use Thread Pool

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms973903.aspx

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1  
I thought BackgroundWorker uses ThreadPool internally. That was one of the reasons I chose BackgroundWorker, so I don't have to take care of the maximum number of threads running. –  rdoubleui Aug 18 '09 at 8:09
    
@rdoubleui- you are right it does use the threadpool internally. –  RichardOD Aug 18 '09 at 8:19
    
sure, background worker uses Thread Pool but if you will want to create a collection of background workers (I understood your question in this way) you will get a collection of objects that manage collections of threads) so you are overdesining the application from my point of view. –  Bogdan_Ch Aug 18 '09 at 16:57
    
and in the link that I posted, they tell something about timers. timers also use the Thread Pool, so in any case you will use it :) –  Bogdan_Ch Aug 18 '09 at 17:04
    
Thank you Bogdan_Ch, I came up with the approach to only use timers, as you state. It seems to do the job. I'm just concerned of how "expensive" it is to use the timer only to throw it away and instantiate a new timer object after the task has been done. –  rdoubleui Aug 25 '09 at 19:04

Since nobody did it so far, I'll throw in the timer approach. I tried to combine the two (BackgroundWorker and Timer), but that didn't make sense.

I wanted a mechanism to allow multiple instances to request data by thread. Also, I wanted some interval in between.

So after trying around, I figured I could get along with a Timer-approach only:

public void ConnectDataProvider()
    {
        timer = new Timer(new TimerCallback(tCallback), null, 0, Timeout.Infinite);            
    }

private void tCallback(object state)
    {
        timer.Dispose();
        // time consuming task
        WriteData();
        timer = new Timer(new TimerCallback(tCallback), null, 5000, Timeout.Infinite);
    }

That was what John Saunders suggested on a similar (but different) problem. It seems to do the job. The WriteData() has a synchronous HttpWebRequest, so it can handle a timeout.

My question now is: How expensive is the new instantiation of the timer object? By how expensive I mean: Are there better ways to achieve that?

Note: The asynchronous approach of the WebRequest won't work, I tried that. I have no clue so far, if that is a manner of the server.

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