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I have some C++ code, in which the following enum is declared:

enum Some 
{
   Some_Alpha = 0,
   Some_Beta,
   Some_Gamma,
   Some_Total
};
int array[Some_Total];

The values of Alpha, Beta and Gamma are sequential, and I gladly use the following cycle to iterate through them:

for ( int someNo = (int)Some_Alpha; someNo < (int)Some_Total; ++someNo ) {}

This cycle is ok, until I decide to change the order of the declarations in the enum, say, making Beta the first value and Alpha - the second one. That invalidates the cycle header, because now I have to iterate from Beta to Total. So, what are the best practices of iterating through enum? I want to iterate through all the values without changing the cycle headers every time. I can think of one solution:

enum Some 
{
   Some_Start = -1,
   Some_Alpha,
   ...
   Some_Total
};
int array[Some_Total];

and iterate from (Start + 1) to Total, but it seems ugly and I have never seen someone doing it in the code. Is there any well-known paradigm for iterating through the enum, or I just have to fix the order of the enum values? (let's pretend, I really have some awesome reasons for changing the order of the enum values)...

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Could you provide an example on when this is needed? Or is this purely theoretical ? –  Zed Aug 18 '09 at 8:04
    
My code depends on the designers' team decisions. They sometimes change their mind about the order of elements, present on the screen. I have to update my enum values according to what the current order of the elements is... –  SadSido Aug 18 '09 at 8:36
    
Normally you wouldn't change the order - if you do, things that rely on that order (if you are using enums at both ends of a comms system, writing the values to a file/database) will break. –  graham.reeds Aug 18 '09 at 9:11
    
@Graham: I guess that's why he's asking how to write code which does not rely on the order, so that his code won't "break". IMO this is good practice and to be encouraged. –  Steve Jessop Aug 18 '09 at 11:28
    
@onebyone The question is, why does he need to iterate over enum values (in order or not) at all? In over 25 years of C & C++ programming I've never needed to do this. –  anon Aug 18 '09 at 13:40
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7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted
enum Some
{
   Some_first_ = 0,
   Some_Alpha = Some_first_,
....
   Some_last_
};

Doing such you can grant first & last never changes order

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11  
Why the double underscores? Those names are illegal in C++. –  anon Aug 18 '09 at 8:03
6  
Names that contain the double underscore are reserved by the C++ Standard for the C++ implementation - you are not allowed to use them in your own code. –  anon Aug 18 '09 at 9:44
1  
@Dewfy if he's right why don't you fix your code?? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 18 '09 at 15:21
1  
@litb - I have already written about it: "sked about paradigm, and nobody forces your to violate code convention." This code is compiled at least at 3 compilers without any warning. I don't see error, but agree that exist world-wide convention about names. –  Dewfy Aug 18 '09 at 15:27
1  
@sbi - HEY! GUYS! What wrong with you all?!? The question relates to practice - how to count items inside enum. Everybody that make comments cannot see the kernel of question, but all of you can see 2 underscore. Special for you, sample above now changed from __ to some_. Thank you for vigilance! –  Dewfy Jul 26 '11 at 9:32
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You can define an operator++() for your enum. This has the advantage that it uses the well-known paradigm of the standard incrementation operators. :)

Depending on whether your enums are contiguous, you can treat them as int or use a switch:

Some& operator++(Some& obj)
{
# if YOUR_ENUMS_ARE_CONTIGUOUS
  int i = obj;
  if( ++i > Some_Total ) i = Some_Alpha;
  return obj = static_cast<Some>(i);
# else 
  switch(obj)
  {
    case Some_Alpha : obj = Some_Beta;  break;
    case Some_Beta  : obj = Some_Gamma; break;
    case Some_Gamma : obj = Some_Total; break;
    case Some_Total : obj = Some_Alpha; break;
    default: assert(false); // changed enum but forgot to change operator
  }
  return obj;
# endif
}

Note that, if operator++() is defined, users will probably expect an operator--(), too.

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No, there is no way of doing this because there is no guarantee that someone hasn't written code like:

enum Some 
{
   Some_Alpha = 0,
   Some_Beta,
   Some_Gamma = 42,
   Some_Delta, 
  Some_Total
};
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1  
As sbi has pointed out, there actually is a way of doing this that can handle such a case just fine. –  Dan Moulding Nov 18 '09 at 19:42
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You can check out this article with its source code on how you can implement this with static class members.

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+1, enums are too primitive a datatype to iterate over them, dr. dobb comes to the rescue. –  Ozan Aug 18 '09 at 8:11
    
Great article, thanks! I remember the discussion of "typesafe enum" pattern in some Java book and this is just the same for c++ –  SadSido Aug 18 '09 at 11:48
add comment

In C++11 (and probably earlier), you could use the following hack, to make Some iterable:

Some operator++(Some& s) {
    return s = (Some )(std::underlying_type<Some>::type(x) + 1); 
}
Some operator*(Some s) {
    return s;
} 
Some begin(Some s) {
    return Some_Alpha;

Some end(Some s) {
    return Some_Gamma;
}

int main() { 
    // the parenthesis here instantiate the enum
    for(const auto& s : Some()) { 
        // etc. etc.
    }
    return 0;
}

(This answer was shamelessly adapted from here.)

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If you do not use any assignments, the enums are guaranteed to be sequential starting with 0 as the first. thers.

The best thing you can do is keep them in the order you want in your enum definition, and cycle through them with the for loop.

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I place all Enums in their own namespace. Example:

namespace Foo {
enum Enum {
    First=0, // must be sequential
    Second,
    Third,
    End // must be last
};
}

In code:

for (int i=Foo::First; i!=Foo::End; i++) {
// do stuff
}

This is because C++ allows stuff like this (not tested in a compiler):

enum Foo {
Alpha = 1
};

enum Bar {
Beta = 2
};

Foo foo = Beta;

Which is clearly wrong.

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1  
Almost my enums are declared inside classes, which provide the scope. In C++, the class is the basic scoping unit, not the namespace. –  anon Aug 18 '09 at 8:21
    
A class that exists just for holding an enum doesn't feel right. –  graham.reeds Aug 18 '09 at 8:25
1  
Well, neither does a namespace, as far as I'm concerned. –  anon Aug 18 '09 at 8:28
    
Namespaces are great (and my original enum is hidden inside a class). Ok, but the question is that you are forced to change your enum to { Second, First, Third, End } and you must find and replace all the code, where you iterate through it. –  SadSido Aug 18 '09 at 8:40
    
Normally you wouldn't change the order - if you do, things that rely on that order (if you are using enums at both ends of a comms system, writing the values to a file/database) will break. –  graham.reeds Aug 18 '09 at 9:10
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