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The original problem I tried to solve when stumbled upon this was to select parse_impl version:

  • if the parser (of type U) provides a field named "skp", use that field;
  • if not, use a default value.

I came up with the following code:

// This variant compiles for parsers requiring a skipper:
template <typename I, typename U, typename A,
          typename = typename std::enable_if<
              not std::is_same<
                  typename std::remove_reference<U>::type::skipper_type,
                  qi::unused_type
              >::value
          >::type,
          typename = void > // avoid redefinition (1 more overload not shown)
bool parse_impl(I & start, I end, U && parser, A & attr)
{
    // qi::space by default:
    return qi::phrase_parse(start, end, parser, qi::space, attr);
}

// This variant compiles for parsers providing skipper via 'skp' member:
template <typename I, typename U, typename A,
          typename = typename std::enable_if<
              not std::is_same<
                  typename std::remove_reference<U>::type::skipper_type,
                  qi::unused_type
              >::value
              && (sizeof(U::skp) != 0)
          >::type,
          typename = void, typename = void > // avoid redefinition
bool parse_impl(I & start, I end, U && parser, A & attr)
{
    // parser.skp is available:
    return qi::phrase_parse(start, end, parser, parser.skp, attr);
}

The call site look like this:

pr.is_ok = parse_impl(pr.position, input.cend(), parser, pr.attr);

and this is called both for types having skp and ones that haven't.

And it compiles (on gcc4.7), but I don't understand why: when skp is present, expressions in both enable_ifs should evaluate to true (skipper_type is obviously not equal to unused_type then), and the call should be ambiguous. Where am I mistaken?

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A reduced test case atleast is ambiguous and I can't see if I did anything different there. I can only guess that your third overload, the one with skp, never actually gets called for some reason, if this does indeed compile for you. Maybe put some test print statements in them? Lastly, I recommend reading this blog post aswell as this question and this answer. :) –  Xeo Oct 16 '12 at 22:48
    
@Xeo: I've finally nailed it. There is difference, actually: sizeof(NoRef<T>::skp) in your code vs (sizeof(U::skp) != 0) in mine. NoRef has finally brought the ambiguity in! HUGE thanks for help and the links! –  vines Oct 17 '12 at 0:58
    
Ah, so your problem was that when you pass an lvalue (and U is deduced as a reference), you get your SFINAE going. :) And indeed, that's the problem. –  Xeo Oct 17 '12 at 3:35
    
Since there hasn't been any action from your side, should I just post an answer? –  Xeo Oct 24 '12 at 13:08
    
@Xeo Oh yes, please :) –  vines Oct 25 '12 at 0:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem here is, as concluded in the comments, that when using just U::skp, it might be that U is deduced as a reference type (i.e., when passing an lvalue parser). When this happens, you get SFINAE going, as a reference type obviously has no nested anything.

The fix is to remove the reference from U with std::remove_reference so that you have (sizeof(std::remove_reference<T>::type::skp) != 0). Note that typename is not needed here, since ::skp indicates that type has to be a typename.

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