Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is an assignment question I received from school. The question says, write a method called capitalizer which will take the string "ownage" and then displays(doesn't have to return) all the possible capitalization of it, such as "OwNaGE" or "OWnAGE". It doesn't have to work for every string, just the word "ownage" is enough, and it has to be done with recursion.

Here's what I have so far.

import java.util.*;

class MethodAssign2{
   static void capitalizer(String a,int b){
      if(b==-1){
         System.out.println("worked?");
      }else{
         char[] achars = a.toCharArray();
         achars[b] -= 32;
         String caplet = new String(achars);
         System.out.println(caplet);
         System.out.println(a);
         capitalizer(caplet,b-1);
         capitalizer(a,b-1);
      }
   }
   public static void main(String[]args){
      String word = "ownage";
      capitalizer(word,word.length()-1);
   }
}

My mind is completely messed up right now. It seems like I have lots of repeated cases. Do you guys think I'm close the right solution? How do I make it so that nothing happens in the base case rather than printing out something? How do I avoid the repeats? Anyone please help me I would appreciate it very much.

share|improve this question
    
This site is not the right place for this kind of question. Try the code review site. –  bmargulies Oct 16 '12 at 22:30
8  
@bmargulies: I disagree. CodeReview is "Give your opinion about my code". This question is: "I have a problem, this is what I tried, but it failed - how can I make it work?" which is a valid SO question. –  amit Oct 16 '12 at 22:32
2  
No, the op never says that he or she failed, or that anything is wrong, only that they find the code ugly. –  bmargulies Oct 16 '12 at 22:33
    
OP: have you tried testing your code to see if you really have repeated cases etc that you seem to be concerned about? You should give it some input and check the output with smaller words and continue from there to see what specifically is wrong with it.EDIT: re-read the bottom part and it sounds like you have tested it and know there are repeated cases already. –  Mike Oct 16 '12 at 22:35
3  
@bmargulies: Yes he does - and even what the problem is: How do I make it so that nothing happens in the base case rather than printing out something? How do I avoid the repeats? –  amit Oct 16 '12 at 22:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To avoid the repeats - you should print your string only in the stop clause, and not in every iteration.

static void capitalizer(String a,int b){
    if(b==-1){
        System.out.println(a); //CHANGE: printing in the stop clause
    }else{
        char[] achars = a.toCharArray();
        achars[b] -= 32;
        String caplet = new String(achars);
        //CHANGE: not printing every iteration
        capitalizer(caplet,b-1);
        capitalizer(a,b-1);
    }
}

The idea if the algorithm is: In each stage you "guess" what is the current character - is it an upper or lower character, and invoke the algorithm recursively on the smaller problem (with the next character).
You repeat this for both the current letter is and is not capitalized.


The previous code failed because you printed the strings it generated after every letter change, which results in much more (almost double) then all 2^n1 possible ways to print the word.


(1) Bonus: There are exactly 2^n possible strings you can print, because for every character you need to chose: Is it capitalized or not? You repeat this question for each character, and from rule of product - it gives you exactly 2^n possible strings.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I shouldn't just copy what you have, but I think I've tried enough and I understand it now. Thank you very much. –  cook cook Oct 16 '12 at 23:55
1  
@cookcook: You almost got there by yourself, note that the changes I made in your code are very minor. good work, and good luck! –  amit Oct 16 '12 at 23:55

Look at this piece of your code:

System.out.println(caplet);
System.out.println(a);
capitalizer(caplet,b-1);
capitalizer(a,b-1);

You print the current versions of the string, and then have them handled again. However, when being handled further, it will happen that nothing more gets changed. Yet in every iteration, you're still printing this same string.

What you want to do is remove these prints, and add a print at the very end (in the if(b==-1) block) where you print the final result of the specific set of iterations you have completed at that point.

share|improve this answer

Your recursive function should manipulate the first letter of the word that it is given and rely on recursive calls to manipulate the remaining letters. This is a very common problem that occurs when you have to iterate over all possible states of a composite object.

This won't compile, but (I think) here is the solution in pseudocode:

recursion(word){

List list = new List();

String firstLetter = firstLetter(word);
String restOfWord = restOfWord(word);

for( rest : recursion(restOfWord)){
list.append(firstLetter.uppercase()+rest);
list.append(firstLetter.lowercase()+rest);

return list;
}
share|improve this answer

When thinking recursively, think in terms of repeated steps.

So thinking about the last letter, you have:

ownage ownagE

Going back a step you have:

ownage ownagE ownaGe ownaGE

See? You have the alternative values for the last letter, for each of the alternatives for the second to last letter. ANd so on.

So think in terms of 'If I have all the alternatives for the first n letters, how do I then get the alternatives based on the next one?

Think about how to solve that problem, and you'll get a recursive solution.

share|improve this answer
public static void capitalizer(String input) {
    capitalizer("", input);
}

private static void capitalizer(String prefix, String buffer) {
    if (buffer.isEmpty()) {
        System.out.println(prefix);
        return;
    }

    char c = buffer.charAt(0);
    char cup = Character.toUpperCase(c);

    String p = prefix + c;
    String pup = prefix + cup;

    String b = buffer.length() == 0 ? "" : buffer.substring(1, buffer.length());

    capitalizer(p, b);
    capitalizer(pup, b);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    capitalizer("ownage");
}

output,

ownage
ownagE
ownaGe
ownaGE
ownAge
ownAgE
ownAGe
ownAGE
owNage
owNagE
owNaGe
owNaGE
owNAge
owNAgE
owNAGe
owNAGE
oWnage
oWnagE
oWnaGe
oWnaGE
oWnAge
oWnAgE
oWnAGe
oWnAGE
oWNage
oWNagE
oWNaGe
oWNaGE
oWNAge
oWNAgE
oWNAGe
oWNAGE
Ownage
OwnagE
OwnaGe
OwnaGE
OwnAge
OwnAgE
OwnAGe
OwnAGE
OwNage
OwNagE
OwNaGe
OwNaGE
OwNAge
OwNAgE
OwNAGe
OwNAGE
OWnage
OWnagE
OWnaGe
OWnaGE
OWnAge
OWnAgE
OWnAGe
OWnAGE
OWNage
OWNagE
OWNaGe
OWNaGE
OWNAge
OWNAgE
OWNAGe
OWNAGE
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.